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Timely Topic Opens Doyle Colloquia Series

More than 350 people fill the Klump Academic Center Auditorium for Tuesday's first presentation of the newly named Daniel J. Doyle Technology & Society Colloquia Series.
More than 350 people fill the Klump Academic Center Auditorium for Tuesday’s first presentation of the newly named Daniel J. Doyle Technology & Society Colloquia Series.
Against a backdrop of past and present images, Katrina A. Sinclair discusses the use of technology and propaganda by the Nazis and the Islamic State group.
Against a backdrop of past and present images, Katrina A. Sinclair discusses the use of technology and propaganda by the Nazis and the Islamic State group.
Sinclair enhanced her presentation with live polling. After showing a clip from the Nazi-era film, "Triumph of the Will,” for instance, audience members were asked what element was most compelling.
Sinclair enhanced her presentation with live polling. After showing a clip from the Nazi-era film, “Triumph of the Will,” for instance, audience members were asked what element was most compelling.
Faculty member Thomas E. Ask (standing), a member of the colloquium committee and a "microphone runner," facilitates the question-and-answer session that followed the presentation.
Faculty member Thomas E. Ask (standing), a member of the colloquium committee and a “microphone runner,” facilitates the question-and-answer session that followed the presentation.
At the postlecture reception in Wrapture, professor emeritus Daniel J. Doyle – for whom the colloquia series is named – shares a laugh and conversation with audience members.
At the postlecture reception in Wrapture, professor emeritus Daniel J. Doyle – for whom the colloquia series is named – shares a laugh and conversation with audience members.

An adjunct member of Penn College’s history faculty offered an absorbing look at technology and propaganda on Oct. 6 in the first presentation of the Daniel J. Doyle Technology & Society Colloquia Series. In “From the Nazis to ISIS: A Historical Analysis of Technology and Propaganda,” Katrina A. Sinclair drew a parallel between the Nazis’ convincing use of broadcast venues and the Islamic State’s embrace of social media in recruiting and rallying their respective followers. While the subject matter raises difficult questions and provocative conversation, she said, it points to the importance of open dialogue – a discussion she hopes will develop proactive strategies to counter extreme ideologies in our global society. The next event in the series will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 3, when Alan R. Neuner, vice president for facilities operations at Geisinger Medical Center, presents “Improving National Health Through Energy Efficiency.” Sinclair’s full presentation can be seen on the college’s YouTube Channel: