Skip to main content

Summit Successfully Apprises Industry of Apprenticeship Assistance

A sold-out crowd of industry leaders and their advocates, representing 66 employers across Pennsylvania and from four other states, attended Thursday’s inaugural Apprenticeship Summit to address substantive progress in narrowing the skills gap in manufacturing. Attendees were welcomed by Pennsylvania College of Technology President Davie Jane Gilmour, who announced three major related developments: the eligibility of mechatronics apprentices to earn 20 credits toward a two-year Penn College degree in the field; establishment of The Apprenticeship Center on campus as a resource for collaborating with state and local partners; and a $576,000 grant from the state Department of Community & Economic Development to fund apprenticeships in mechatronics and computer numerical control occupations, as well as pre-apprenticeship programs for high school students. The keynote speaker was Robert I. Lerman, a professional economist, Urban Institute fellow and expert on apprenticeships whose resume includes a doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Others on the dais included Lori Renne and Alex Halper, from the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry; Jim Nemeth, of Autoneum; and Eric Ramsay, representing the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry. The afternoon session featured an interactive program among participants, designed to provide companies with a convenient opportunity to speak to those involved in all facets of apprenticeship.

– Photos by Cindy Davis Meixel, writer/photo editor,
and Larry D. Kauffman, digital publishing specialist/photographer

Subscribe to PCToday Daily Email.

Related Stories

Pennsylvania College of Technology student Chandler P. Shatto, of Mount Pleasant Mills, uses software donated by ABB Robotics to program a YuMi dual-arm robot. The RobotStudio software is valued at over $400,000 and will be used by about 60 students per year. Shatto is seeking a bachelor’s degree in automation engineering technology: robotics & automation.
Automated Manufacturing & Machining

Robot software donation benefits Penn College students

Read more
Thanks to a helpful lift from Dad, a boy gets a better look at the laser burning his name onto a souvenir keychain.
Automated Manufacturing & Machining

‘F’ as in farm … and food … and freebies … and future careers!

Read more
Brackets for face shields to be used by health care workers are cut from a polycarbonate sheet on a CNC router. Pennsylvania College of Technology student Matthew Semmel, of Palmerton, modified his CNC router to cut the pieces between classes while studying from home.
Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies

Student uses know-how, home equipment to make face shields

Read more