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Study Abroad Trip Resonates Long After Travelers’ Return

A colorful Guatemalan scarf is displayed by David S. Banks, a surveying technology student from Williamsport. Banks said the trip was “a profound experience,” informing his career studies and cultural understanding. He has petitioned to graduate next month and plans to return in the fall to major in civil engineering technology.
A colorful Guatemalan scarf is displayed by David S. Banks, a surveying technology student from Williamsport. Banks said the trip was “a profound experience,” informing his career studies and cultural understanding. He has petitioned to graduate next month and plans to return in the fall to major in civil engineering technology.
Elizabeth “Ellie” J. Gold’s presentation focused on medicinal herbs used by the Maya. Gold is a welding and fabrication engineering technology student from Mount Airy, Md.
Elizabeth “Ellie” J. Gold’s presentation focused on medicinal herbs used by the Maya. Gold is a welding and fabrication engineering technology student from Mount Airy, Md.
The study abroad trip was the first time Joseph M. Morrin had traveled back to his native country since his adoption as an infant. His presentation explored issues of personal identify in diverse cultures. He shares his experience with his brother Christopher J. (left). The brothers reside in Morrisville. Joseph is a freshman in graphic design. Christopher has earned degrees in heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology and building automation technology, and has petitioned to graduate in electrical technology in May.
The study abroad trip was the first time Joseph M. Morrin had traveled back to his native country since his adoption as an infant. His presentation explored issues of personal identify in diverse cultures. He shares his experience with his brother Christopher J. (left). The brothers reside in Morrisville. Joseph is a freshman in graphic design. Christopher has earned degrees in heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology and building automation technology, and has petitioned to graduate in electrical technology in May.
Room 105C of the CC  fills with displays, students and inquisitive guests.
Room 105C of the CC fills with displays, students and inquisitive guests.
Civil engineering technology student Trevor C. Kulynych, of Hummelstown, was impressed with the precision of the Maya’s structures, plazas and roads.
Civil engineering technology student Trevor C. Kulynych, of Hummelstown, was impressed with the precision of the Maya’s structures, plazas and roads.

International explorations were brought “home” when students in Mathematics in Non-European Cultures presented their study abroad projects in the Bush Campus Center on Thursday. The group, comprising 15 students and three faculty members, traveled to Guatemala over winter break to study Mayan culture, including examples of mathematics, architecture, design, engineering, astronomy and archaeoastronomy. This was the sixth time the MTH 156 course has journeyed to Mexico or Guatemala and the largest group to make the trek. The class is led by D. Robert Cooley, associate professor of anthropology/environmental science, and Curt E. Vander Vere, assistant professor of mathematics.