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Students Celebrate National Surgical Technologists Week


Pennsylvania College of Technology’s surgical technology Class of 2015 is joining hospitals and colleges throughout the U.S. in celebrating National Surgical Technologists Week, Sept. 21-27.

The week is promoted through the Association of Surgical Technologists to recognize this important segment of the health care field. To celebrate, Penn College students painted “The Rock,” a unique campus “billboard,” and were treated to a surprise lunch to start off the week.

Pennsylvania College of Technology surgical technology students painted a campus landmark in honor of National Surgical Technologists Week. Atop the rock, from left, are: Reda A. Vermilya, of Turbotville; Holly M. Neely, of Lebanon; Ronald M. Furr, of Sunbury; Victoria L. Candelora, of Shamokin; Ashley Holmes, of Muncy; and Chelsea E. Oldt, of Muncy. Ground level, from left: Leah M. Aldrich, of Hallstead; Emeka K. Okereh, of Williamsport; Jade E. Stover, of Jersey Shore; Rachel L. Carlson, of Blossburg; Nola C. Hitchens, of Williamsport; Margaret H. Hartman, of Leesport; Liliya S. Stefanovich, of Port Matilda; and Allison M. Fowler, of East Berlin.
Pennsylvania College of Technology surgical technology students painted a campus landmark in honor of National Surgical Technologists Week. Atop the rock, from left, are: Reda A. Vermilya, of Turbotville; Holly M. Neely, of Lebanon; Ronald M. Furr, of Sunbury; Victoria L. Candelora, of Shamokin; Ashley Holmes, of Muncy; and Chelsea E. Oldt, of Muncy. Ground level, from left: Leah M. Aldrich, of Hallstead; Emeka K. Okereh, of Williamsport; Jade E. Stover, of Jersey Shore; Rachel L. Carlson, of Blossburg; Nola C. Hitchens, of Williamsport; Margaret H. Hartman, of Leesport; Liliya S. Stefanovich, of Port Matilda; and Allison M. Fowler, of East Berlin.

Surgical technologists serve as an integral part of the surgical team, providing surgical care to patients. They work under the supervision of a surgeon to facilitate the safe and effective conduct of surgical procedures.

The role of the surgical technologist was born during World War II, when the need for perioperative personnel was overwhelming, and evolved into a separate allied health field.

Today, surgical technologists are working in one of the fastest-growing professions in the country. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the surgical technology profession will grow faster than the average of all other occupations through the year 2020, and it is anticipated that the volume of surgery will increase exponentially due to the expanding senior population.

To learn more about Penn College’s surgical technology degree, call 570-327-4519.

For more about the college, which is celebrating its Centennial throughout 2014, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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