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Students assist with health, safety at Little League World Series

Nine students in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s paramedic program will be part of the health care team at the 2022 Little League Baseball® World Series, scheduled for Aug. 17-28.

In addition, a student in Penn College’s emergency management & homeland security major is helping to keep participants and guests safe through a summer internship at Little League’s international headquarters, where the series is held.

The nationally televised series draws tens of thousands of spectators each day to the Little League World Series complex in South Williamsport, just a few miles from the Penn College campus.

Rebecca Baker, an emergency management & homeland security student at Pennsylvania College of Technology, is helping to keep participants and guests safe during the 2022 Little League Baseball World Series. Baker, of Watsontown, is an intern in Little League International’s security and risk management departments. Nine students in Penn College’s paramedic program are also assisting at the series, running Aug. 17-28.
Rebecca Baker, an emergency management & homeland security student at Pennsylvania College of Technology, is helping to keep participants and guests safe during the 2022 Little League Baseball World Series. Baker, of Watsontown, is an intern in Little League International’s security and risk management departments. Nine students in Penn College’s paramedic program are also assisting at the series, running Aug. 17-28.

Students in the college’s paramedic majors will be on hand in the stadiums to provide for the emergency health care needs of the game’s spectators. They work under the guidance of certified professionals from Susquehanna Regional Emergency Medical Services.

Participating students include Elizabeth A. Goodrich, of Middlebury Center; Kaylin J. Hicks, of Hughesville; Breyann E. Johnson, of Danville; Mackenzie H. Karasek, of South Williamsport; Allison Lavallee Harris, of Williamsport; Camden T. Nuttle, of Williamsport; Emilee K. Snook, of Montoursville; Charidan B. Updyke, of Greensburg; and Aleyah D. Walter, of Hughesville.

The international event exposes the paramedic students to diversity in health care and to the time, preparation and interagency cooperation required to provide care at a large-scale event.

They are under the direction of Dr. Gregory R. Frailey, emergency medical services physician with UPMC in North Central Pa. and medical director for Penn College’s paramedic and physician assistant programs.

Dr. Frailey and the students help support the comprehensive emergency services offered at the series in coordination with Dr. Jeffrey Myers, emergency medicine physician with UPMC in North Central Pa. and medical director of Susquehanna Regional EMS.

Emergency management & homeland security student Rebecca Baker, of Watsontown, is looking after players’ and guests’ safety as an intern in Little League International’s security and risk management departments.

“I am beyond excited to be interning at Little League! I feel lucky to have this position,” Baker said. “I always wondered what goes on behind the scenes, and now I am finding out. The passion the staff at Little League put into their work is amazing, and I am grateful to be a part of the 2022 World Series.”

Among her duties, Baker is conducting credentialing of team members and performing background checks on various individuals working at the event, including members of the media.

“The most important task during the series is credentialing for all team members upon arrival,” she shared. “Electronic security will be monitoring all areas of the Little League complex to keep teams, families and staff safe. Another task will be granting access to specific buildings and gates for appropriate sponsors, team hosts, event staff, ushers, etc., if needed. I will collaborate with all security hubs, including connecting lost children with parents using facial recognition tracing.”

Penn College offers a certificate in paramedic practice, an associate degree in paramedic science, and bachelor’s degrees in prehospital medicine and emergency management & homeland security. Students can also pursue a dual degree in paramedic science and emergency management, achieving both an associate degree and a bachelor’s in four years of full-time study.

For more about paramedic and prehospital majors, visit the School of Nursing & Health Sciences. To learn more about emergency management & homeland security, visit the School of Business, Arts & Sciences.

For more about the college, a national leader in applied technology education, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free at 800-367-9222.

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