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Soon-to-be grads present capstone brews to discerning judges

An amber glow awaits assessment.
An amber glow awaits assessment.
An attentive audience fills the brewing lab in the Hager Lifelong Education Center. Brewing instructor Yarrington (at right) listens to Ryan J. Hampton offer enlightenment on the history of pale ales. Hampton, of Williamsport, also holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy.
An attentive audience fills the brewing lab in the Hager Lifelong Education Center. Brewing instructor Yarrington (at right) listens to Ryan J. Hampton offer enlightenment on the history of pale ales. Hampton, of Williamsport, also holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy.
Examining the aroma and color of samples are (from left): John Callahan, brewing manager at D.G. Yuengling & Son Inc.; Justin M. Ingram, assistant professor of biology; and David S. Richards, professor of physics.
Examining the aroma and color of samples are (from left): John Callahan, brewing manager at D.G. Yuengling & Son Inc.; Justin M. Ingram, assistant professor of biology; and David S. Richards, professor of physics.
Discussing the style standards of American amber ales and his own “take” on the style is Mark R. Kitchen, of Danville.
Discussing the style standards of American amber ales and his own “take” on the style is Mark R. Kitchen, of Danville.
Sean J. Hamilton, of Buffalo, N.Y., schools guests on the topic of “AMG” (amyloglucosidase enzymes).
Sean J. Hamilton, of Buffalo, N.Y., schools guests on the topic of “AMG” (amyloglucosidase enzymes).

Among the recent capstone presentations held across campus, graduating students in Penn College’s brewing and fermentation science degree presented their culminating brews to an audience that included natural sciences and hospitality faculty. Two presentations were conducted, with the soon-to-be-professional brewers offering small assessment samples of their two final brews. “The primary goals of these events were twofold: one benefit to the students was to add feedback and commentary on their capstone beers from a random group of consumers to the feedback they received from the professional panels I assembled earlier in the semester,” said Timothy L. Yarrington, instructor of brewing and fermentation science. “Another was to expose the students to the challenge of engaging consumers about their beers and explaining the history, processes and rationale that inform their characteristic color, flavor and aroma. Brewers rely on professional and consumer feedback to inform their choices. We are also continually in a position to increase the beer IQ of the consumer through educational dialogue.” Six students will graduate May 17 with Associate of Applied Science degrees in brewing and fermentation science.

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