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Simulated Emergencies Attest to Health Sciences’ Interdisciplinary Response


Paramedic and nursing students interview a patient actor outside the Keystone Dining Room.
Paramedic and nursing students interview a patient actor outside the Keystone Dining Room.
Student nurses gather the vital signs of a heart attack patient outside the Fitness Center.
Student nurses gather the vital signs of a heart attack patient outside the Fitness Center.
A paramedic student sets a defibrillator.
A paramedic student sets a defibrillator.
Students observe the action in the “emergency room” at Student Health Services after a patient arrives by ambulance.
Students observe the action in the “emergency room” at Student Health Services after a patient arrives by ambulance.
Nursing and paramedic students approach a trauma victim in the Bardo Gymnasium building.
Nursing and paramedic students approach a trauma victim in the Bardo Gymnasium building.

Penn College’s Nursing, Paramedic Technology and Physician Assistant programs staged two days of mock emergencies this week that provided collaborative opportunities for more than 100 students in the three disciplines. Volunteers for the event were recruited from across campus. They included actors playing the roles of four patients: A pregnant woman who was seizing outside the Keystone Dining Room, a man experiencing a heart attack outside the Fitness Center, a 13-year-old struck by a pickup truck near Bardo Gym, and a patient with post-traumatic stress disorder who struck the bike rider and may have been drunk. Also called into play was Student Health Services, which provided one of two “hospital” spaces, and the Office of Instructional Technology, which recorded the event. “The event is intended to help the School of Health Sciences demonstrate that we truly live out our mission and philosophy statements,” said Tushanna M. Habalar, learning lab coordinator for nursing education, one of many employees in the School of Health Sciences who helped with the event.
Middle three photos by Marc T. Kaylor, student photographer

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