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Penn College offers injection molding processing series

A dozen plastics professionals representing five companies benefited from a recent weeklong workshop hosted by Pennsylvania College of Technology and its renowned Plastics Innovation & Resource Center.

The Injection Molding Processing Series combined lecture and hands-on experience in covering decoupled molding setup and operation and the injection molding process. Through real-world examples and troubleshooting sessions, participants learned how the mold, machine and plastic material all play a role in the molding of plastics parts.

Plastics professionals study an all-electric injection molding machine during the recent Injection Molding Processing Series hosted by Pennsylvania College of Technology and its Plastics Innovation & Resource Center. A dozen individuals representing five companies participated in the weeklong workshop.
Plastics professionals study an all-electric injection molding machine during the recent Injection Molding Processing Series hosted by Pennsylvania College of Technology and its Plastics Innovation & Resource Center. A dozen individuals representing five companies participated in the weeklong workshop.

“The course ‘connected the dots’ between the terms of processing that I picked up during my first five months on the job,” said Jacob Sheaffer, a senior process technician at Thermo Fisher Scientific in Millersburg.

“Excellent seminar! Covered great material! Exactly what I was looking for,” enthused Richard Fillis, a mechanic at B. Braun Medical Inc. in Allentown.

Fillis also praised the work of course leader, Timothy Weston, whom he called an “extremely knowledgeable instructor.”

Associate professor emeritus of plastics technology, Weston retired in August 2020 after nearly 34 years of service to the college. He founded and developed the school’s plastics program and the Plastics Manufacturing Center (now the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center).

Mark A. Sneidman, instructor of plastics & polymer technology, assisted Weston throughout the week.

Engel Machinery Inc. served as platinum sponsor of the Injection Molding Processing Series, and its all-electric injection molding machine was used during the workshop.

The PIRC is one of the top plastics technology centers in the nation for research, development and education related to injection molding, extrusion, blow molding, rotational molding and thermoforming. To learn more, call 570-321-5533.

Penn College is one of six institutions nationwide offering plastics degrees that are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET. Students may seek a bachelor’s degree in plastics & polymer engineering technology or an associate degree in plastics & polymer technology.

For information about those and other majors within the School of Engineering Technologies, call 570-327-4520.

Penn College is a national leader in applied technology education. Email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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