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Penn College Hits Another All-Time High

Pennsylvania College of Technology continues to realize record-high enrollment. Following the first full week of fall semester classes, 5,310 full- and part-time students are enrolled in credit classes. This marks an approximate 6-percent increase over last year’s record-breaking full- and part-time student headcount of 4,958. The College’s full-time equivalent* enrollment is now 4,747 also an approximate 6-percent increase over last year’s figure of 4,441.

“The College had anticipated record enrollments this year and we are delighted,” commented Penn College President Dr. Davie Jane Gilmour.” This demonstrates that the programs and services that the College provides meet the needs of the Commonwealth and its workforce and are attractive to prospective students.”

This fall, baccalaureate majors account for 24.9 percent of the total student population, with 1,323 students enrolled in the four-year degree programming. This marks a 21.7-percent increase over Fall ’97. The College first introduced bachelor degree majors in 1992.

Officials believe the appeal of bachelor of science degrees and an enhanced collegiate environment featuring an array of student activities is continuing to attract more students to Penn College.

In its second year of providing on-campus student housing, the College reports both The Village at Penn College (320-bed capacity) and Campus View Apartments (330 beds) are filled to capacity.

Penn College also continues to attract international students to its campus. This year approximately 50 international students are enrolled, hailing from a wide range of countries including Japan, South Africa, Spain, Peru, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Kenya, Tanzania, Barbados, Canada, and the United Arab Emirates.

* Full-time equivalent numbers are established by adding the number of full-time students and then totaling the number of credits taken by part-time students, divided by the number of credits required for a full-time course load. It allows the administration to equate the total student body population to a full-time equivalency.