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Penn College Graduates Commissioned in ROTC Ceremony


Four new Pennsylvania College of Technology graduates experienced a second milestone during the college’s commencement weekend: commissioning as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army Reserve.

Kyle A. Csorba, of Trenton, New Jersey; Daniel G. Curtin, of Berwick; Daniel H. Pulinski, of Penfield, New York; and Craig W. Robbins, of Newton, New Jersey, received the honor during an Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps ceremony at Bucknell University.

From left, Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour, Daniel G. Curtin, of Berwick; Craig W. Robbins, of Newton, New Jersey; Daniel H. Pulinski, of Penfield, New York; Kyle A. Csorba; of Trenton, New Jersey; and Carolyn R. Strickland, vice president for enrollment management/associate provost.
From left, Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour, Daniel G. Curtin, of Berwick; Craig W. Robbins, of Newton, New Jersey; Daniel H. Pulinski, of Penfield, New York; Kyle A. Csorba; of Trenton, New Jersey; and Carolyn R. Strickland, vice president for enrollment management/associate provost.
Family members "pin" Kyle A. Csorba, displaying the gold bars of a second lieutenant.
Family members “pin” Kyle A. Csorba, displaying the gold bars of a second lieutenant.

“Our four graduating ROTC cadets have demonstrated incredible academic excellence and commitment to ROTC and the Penn College community,” said Carolyn R. Strickland, vice president for enrollment management/associate provost, who attended the ceremony with Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour.

Csorba graduated with a bachelor’s degree in residential construction technology and management. He will attend Engineer Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, before serving as an active-duty engineer officer. He hopes to be stationed in Germany.

Daniel G. Curtin receives an important "first salute," an honor afforded a respected soldier close to the new officer.
Daniel G. Curtin receives an important “first salute,” an honor afforded a respected soldier close to the new officer.

Curtin earned a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology. He will attend Air Defense Artillery Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Still, Oklahoma. Curtin plans to serve in Korea as an active-duty Air Defense artillery officer.

After taking his oath, Daniel H. Pulinski is helped by family as he transitions from cadet to Army officer.
After taking his oath, Daniel H. Pulinski is helped by family as he transitions from cadet to Army officer.

Pulinski received his bachelor’s degree in residential construction technology and management: building construction technology concentration. He will attend Engineer Basic Officer Leaders Course at Fort Leonard Wood. He will serve as an Army Reserve engineer officer.

Robbins graduated with a bachelor’s degree in aviation maintenance technology. He will attend flight school at Fort Rucker, Alabama. Following two years of flight school, he will serve as a helicopter pilot in the Pennsylvania National Guard.

“We have watched with pride as these cadets have developed into leaders,” Strickland said. “Through their leadership roles, they have impacted our campus and the lives of so many in such meaningful ways. We are grateful for their service.”

Craig W. Robbins leads his loved ones back to their seats after the ceremonial pinning.
Craig W. Robbins leads his loved ones back to their seats after the ceremonial pinning.

Penn College is part of the Bison Battalion ROTC program, which includes Bucknell, Susquehanna and Bloomsburg universities and Lycoming College.

Strickland is expecting between four and eight incoming cadets for the 2016-17 academic year at Penn College.

Army Brig. Gen. Richard B. Dix, commander, Defense Logistics Agency Distribution, addresses the Rooke Chapel audience.
Army Brig. Gen. Richard B. Dix, commander, Defense Logistics Agency Distribution, addresses the Rooke Chapel audience.

“ROTC offers exciting opportunities for students to learn about leadership and military service as a commissioned officer in the active Army, or part time in the Army Reserve or Army National Guard,” she said. “Many Penn College students have successfully earned ROTC scholarships, which provide significant funding for college and open career pathways that directly align with their course of study.”

Penn College has earned “Military Friendly” status for seven consecutive years. During the spring semester, 370 veterans were enrolled, including 82 serving in the National Guard and Reserves.

For information on ROTC at Penn College, call 570-320-2400, ext. 7298 or email instructor Garrett D. Ruud.

For more about Penn College, a national leader in applied technology education and workforce development, visit www.pct.edu, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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