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Out-of-the-Classroom Curb Appeal

Stabley, at far right, and his band of new environmental artists encircle one of the creations.
Stabley, at far right, and his band of new environmental artists encircle one of the creations.
A stone spiral crafted by Stabley and Dexter G. Smith, heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology, is an eye-catching element.
A stone spiral crafted by Stabley and Dexter G. Smith, heating, ventilation and air conditioning technology, is an eye-catching element.
When Clint J. Walker and Joshua K. Kryder found this nest that had fallen near their project site on the second day of work, they incorporated it into their design. Walker is an information technology sciences: gaming and simulation student; Kryder majors in plastics and polymer engineering technology.
When Clint J. Walker and Joshua K. Kryder found this nest that had fallen near their project site on the second day of work, they incorporated it into their design. Walker is an information technology sciences: gaming and simulation student; Kryder majors in plastics and polymer engineering technology.
“A waterfall effect” is the artistic attempt by James A. Jeffries (left) information technology sciences: gaming and simulation, and Daniel W. Deshong, a 2015 diesel technology grad now enrolled in the applied management major.
“A waterfall effect” is the artistic attempt by James A. Jeffries (left) information technology sciences: gaming and simulation, and Daniel W. Deshong, a 2015 diesel technology grad now enrolled in the applied management major.
Luke D. McFalls, welding and fabrication engineering technology, and Patrick M. Murray, aviation maintenance technology, aimed for balance in these two small arches.
Luke D. McFalls, welding and fabrication engineering technology, and Patrick M. Murray, aviation maintenance technology, aimed for balance in these two small arches.

As an icebreaker exercise to launch the fall semester, David A. Stabley, instructor of ceramics/wood sculpture, led students in his ART 142 wood sculpture class through an exploration of the environmental art created by famed British sculptor Andy Goldsworthy. The students then moved out of their Bush Campus Center lab and into nearby landscaping areas, and, in pairs, created their own environmental art pieces using stones and other found objects. “I wanted them to start thinking outside the box,” Stabley said. “The weather was nice, and so many people who were walking by commented on the project and asked questions like ‘What class is this?’ – it all became part of the process.” While ultimately temporary artwork, the small project continues the tradition of artistic exploration and artwork around campus.
Third and fifth photos by Grace F. Clark, student photographer