Skip to main content
Main Penn College Website

Need meets know-how in college’s 3D printing lab


A Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member is employing his expertise to help protect front-line workers battling the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Eric K. Albert, associate professor of automated manufacturing and machining, is producing face shields with the college’s Stratasys 3D printers. Following a “recipe” provided by the company, Albert is manufacturing visors containing three mounting points for the insertion of clear plastic material to serve as the shield.  

You punch three holes into an acrylic sheet, snap it into the visor and you have a face shield,” Albert said. 

He estimated that it takes seven hours per batch of five plastic visors and that the college has the capacity to produce 10 visors a day. Albert is using his personal supply of acrylic sheets for the shield component. 

Depending on supplies, Albert said he can make three or four dozen face shields, which he anticipates will be shared with health care facilities and nursing homes throughout the Williamsport area.  

“It’s a classic case of technology solving problems,” Albert said. “This is giving students a first-hand look at the important role technology, in this case additive manufacturing, can play in combating a crisis.”  

As part of remote instruction for his additive manufacturing class, Albert is challenging the students to create, investigate and improve designs of products that can aid both health care workers and the general public. 

Related Stories

Pennsylvania College of Technology is accepting applications for its CNC machinist certificate. The program will be offered for the first time this fall. Automated Manufacturing & Machining
Penn College offering new manufacturing certificate
Read more
Eric K. Albert, associate professor of automated manufacturing at Pennsylvania College of Technology, holds three of the eight vent splitters he made with his home 3D printer in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Albert followed directions provided by ventsplitter.org to manufacture the splitters, which are awaiting emergency FDA approval. As a last resort, the vent splitter allows multiple patients to share one ventilator. Automated Manufacturing & Machining
Penn College professor manufactures ventilator splitters
Read more
Four Pennsylvania College of Technology students received scholarships from Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs, the foundation of the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association International: Tyler J. Bandle, of Slatington, and John A. Provenza Jr., of Marysville, automated manufacturing technology; Sean A. Bush, of Williamsport, electrical technology; and Cinnamon A. Digan, of Mifflinburg, welding and fabrication engineering technology. Automated Manufacturing & Machining
Penn College manufacturing students earn scholarships
Read more