Skip to main content

Make Way for Tomorrow

A makerspace, providing a fertile environment for innovation and imagination – and the tools with which students can turn visions into reality – was dedicated in Penn College’s Carl Building Technologies Center on Tuesday. The student-designed Dr. Welch Workshop memorializes Dr. Marshall Welch Jr., a local orthodontist and longtime philanthropist, who died in 2012. The Welch family, including son Marshall III, is the principal donor for the facility; George E. “Herman” Logue Jr. supported the so-called “dirty space” (the Logue Fabritorium) and Frederick T. Gilmour, faculty emeritus, made a commitment for the “clean space” (the Gilmour Tinkertorium). The ceremony spotlighted the students and faculty members who brainstormed the idea into existence, and included representative comments from Rob A. Wozniak, associate professor of architectural technology: “With the many students from various majors that will use this makerspace, it is hoped that they take the opportunity to collaborate with others. To create. To explore. To learn about the tools that they may otherwise never have been able to have access to. To try another way of doing something. To invent (and maybe even patent) something new! And, as a result, Penn College, the community and the world will all benefit … from this amazing collaborative effort.”

– Photos by Cindy Davis Meixel, writer/photo editor

Subscribe to PCToday Daily Email

Related Stories

William J. “Will” Moyer II, an engineering manager at TE Connectivity and graduate of Pennsylvania College of Technology's plastics and polymer program, facilitated the donation of electronic components to his alma mater.
Alumni

TE Connectivity donates components to various college majors

Read more
Three female assistant deans for the School of Engineering Technologies at Pennsylvania College of Technology are a source of inspiration for students like Lauryn A. Stauffer (third from left), who is majoring in automation engineering technology: robotics and automation. While women comprise nearly half the labor force, they account for just 27% of STEM workers. From left are: Stacey C. Hampton, industrial and computer technologies; Ellyn A. Lester, construction and architectural technologies; Stauffer; and Kathleen D. Chesmel, materials science and engineering technologies.
Architecture & Sustainable Design

Female trio helps lead engineering technologies at Penn College

Read more
Students network with employers in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Field House during Fall Career Fair including (in foreground) Toyota, which was recruiting for automotive-, business- and communication-related majors.
College Relations

Employers, students embrace Penn College Career Fair

Read more