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Illusionist Andr Kole to Perform March 26 in Auditorium


Renowned illusionist Andr Kole, who has performed for millions of people through live and televised shows in the United States and 75 other countries, will present his “Magical Spectacular” on Monday, March 26, at Pennsylvania College of Technology.

The program, scheduled for 7:30 p.m. at the Klump Academic Center Auditorium, is being sponsored by the student organization, Campus Crusade for Christ at Penn College. Tickets $5 for students and $7 for adults may be purchased at the door.

Kole often appears as a special traveling representative for Campus Crusade for Christ International, an interdenominational Christian organization founded in 1951. Several years ago, Kole says, he was challenged to examine the miracles of Jesus Christ from the standpoint of an illusionist and skeptic, to determine if they could have been the work of a master magician. Kole made discoveries that he said changed the course of his life, and he shares some of these findings in his performances, during which he also presents the Gospel message and seeks audience responses.

A leading inventor of magical effects, Kole owned a successful business that built and marketed magical inventions that he developed. In addition to holding the highest award from the Academy of Magical Arts in Hollywood, Kole is a creative consultant for David Copperfield, perhaps the best-known magician in the world.

In his colorful full-stage production, Kole combines his performing skill with an extensive background as a psychic investigator and inventor of magical effects. As a usual feature of the show, Kole draws on his research as a psychic investigator to “bring out the truth behind communication with the dead, transcendental levitation and other psychic phenomena, as well as the Bermuda Triangle and psychic surgery.” His “Magical Spectacular” includes people materializing and dematerializing and other “impossible phenomenon.”

For “Time” magazine, Kole made a study of the “psychic surgeons” in the Philippines who claimed to perform miraculous operations without the use of medical instruments or anesthesia. He also testified in court on behalf of the Federal Trade Commission to halt the promotion of fraudulent psychic healers in the United States.

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