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Igniting Imagination

The pursuit of craft in an open-air "classroom"
The pursuit of craft in an open-air “classroom”
Instructor David A. Stabley and his wife, Deborah L. Stabley, an adjunct member of the arts faculty ...
Instructor David A. Stabley and his wife, Deborah L. Stabley, an adjunct member of the arts faculty …
... get down to business with help from Ryan K. Fisher, an engineering design technology senior from Bethel.
… get down to business with help from Ryan K. Fisher, an engineering design technology senior from Bethel.
Rapid cooling completes the Obvara process.
Rapid cooling completes the Obvara process.
Beautiful pieces, destined for public display
Beautiful pieces, destined for public display

The beautiful spring weather of late was an ideal time to take learning outdoors for ceramics classes led by David A. Stabley, instructor of ceramics and wood sculpture. On the lawn of the Bush Campus Center, just outside the studio, Stabley fueled the fancy of student artists with Obvara and raku firings. Obvara is a 19th- to 20th-century technique from the Eastern European country of Belarus. A Japanese pottery technique, raku translates to “happiness in the accident.” The resulting unique creations are on display in the cases outside the ceramic studio (CC, Room 159).
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer