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Grant helps Penn College ‘manufacture’ career exploration

A national foundation devoted to manufacturing’s future is teaming with Pennsylvania College of Technology to spark interest among high schoolers in the sector’s rewarding careers.

Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs, the charitable foundation of the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association International, provided a $2,000 grant for the college to host the Thingamajig Fabricators Pre-College Program for students entering grades 9-12. The program is also supported by the PMMI Education and Training Foundation and Construction Specialties Inc.

Courtesy of a grant from Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs and additional support from the PMMI Education and Training Foundation and Construction Specialties Inc., Pennsylvania College of Technology is again hosting a program in which high school students receive hands-on experience with 3D design software, machining, CNC automation and welding. There is a waiting list for the program, which will be offered July 17-21.
Courtesy of a grant from Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs and additional support from the PMMI Education and Training Foundation and Construction Specialties Inc., Pennsylvania College of Technology is again hosting a program in which high school students receive hands-on experience with 3D design software, machining, CNC automation and welding. There is a waiting list for the program, which will be offered July 17-21.

Registration for the program – scheduled for July 17-21 – is full, but the college is collecting a waiting list.

“The high demand for the program is exciting because it’s indicative of genuine interest in manufacturing as a career possibility,” said Bradley M. Webb, dean of engineering technologies, who spearheaded the college’s grant application. “Manufacturing is in desperate need of skilled professionals and offers rich opportunities in a wide variety of fields. Filling the slots for the Thingamajig Fabricators Pre-College Program tells me that message is getting through to some students and their parents.”

According to a study conducted by Deloitte and The Manufacturing Institute, U.S. manufacturing will have an estimated 2.1 million unfilled jobs by 2030.

“It’s common for our students who graduate with a manufacturing-related associate or bachelor’s degree to have multiple job offers before receiving their diploma,” Webb said. “Their technical skill set makes them in-demand tomorrow makers.”

During the Thingamajig Fabricators Pre-College Program, participants will receive hands-on experience with 3D design software, machining, CNC automation and welding. Students will incorporate their new skills in building a toolbox, machinist hammer and center punch.

College faculty will lead workshops in the school’s state-of-the-art labs. Sessions will be complemented by guest speakers and tours of regional manufacturing sites.

Students who complete the program and eventually enroll at Penn College will be eligible to receive $1,000 off their tuition per year.

Send an email to be added to the waiting list for the program. For information about other pre-college programs, including a free one devoted to non-destructive testing, visit the college’s Pre-College Programs page.

For information on Penn College’s various manufacturing degrees and other majors offered by the School of Engineering Technologies, call 570-327-4520.

Penn College is a national leader in applied technology education. Email the Admissions Office or call toll-free at 800-367-9222.

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