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Entranceway Tree Decorated in Honor of College’s Military Family

A tree along the main campus entrance has been decorated with 408 stars, each representing a military member of the Penn College community – and each fashioned by a serviceman enrolled in the School of Industrial, Computing and Engineering Technologies. Using the 60-ton Minster 5 press in the Machining Technologies Center, students of Howard W. Troup, maintenance mechanic/millwright, and Keith H. English, instructor of machine tool technology/automated manufacturing, stamped out the stars using leftover plastic from the school’s thermoforming lab. On Thursday afternoon, student veterans – along with supportive friends from the Financial Aid, Admissions and Registrar’s offices, as well as General Services personnel – adorned the red-, white- and blue-lighted tree in tribute to the 373 students and 35 employees who have identified themselves as veterans.

– Photos by Tom Wilson, writer/editor-PCToday

Howard W. Troup (right) explains safe operation of the press.
Howard W. Troup (right) explains safe operation of the press.

Forming an assembly line for the most efficient creation and collation of 500 stars are (from left) Chester M. Beaver, the college’s veterans affairs coordinator; and manufacturing engineering technology students Robert W. Myers, of Montoursville, who set up the press in preparation for Monday's die-cutting of the ornaments; Justin L. Black, of Turbotville; and Joshua D. King, of Noxen.
Forming an assembly line for the most efficient creation and collation of 500 stars are (from left) Chester M. Beaver, the college’s veterans affairs coordinator; and manufacturing engineering technology students Robert W. Myers, of Montoursville, who set up the press in preparation for Monday’s die-cutting of the ornaments; Justin L. Black, of Turbotville; and Joshua D. King, of Noxen.

Doing his stellar share is Joshua D. Boal, of Olanta, majoring in automated manufacturing technology.
Doing his stellar share is Joshua D. Boal, of Olanta, majoring in automated manufacturing technology.

Some attached ornament hooks, some climbed ladders and some pointed out the bare spots – but all contributed to the labor of love and appreciation.
Some attached ornament hooks, some climbed ladders and some pointed out the bare spots – but all contributed to the labor of love and appreciation.

With fitting proximity to the towering American flag outside the Student and Administrative Services Center, admissions representative Sarah R. Shott strategic places a handful of ornaments.
With fitting proximity to the towering American flag outside the Student and Administrative Services Center, admissions representative Sarah R. Shott strategically places a handful of ornaments.

Hooked and hanging, stars await the helping hands that will lift them into place.
Hooked and hanging, stars await the helping hands that will lift them into place.

Jacob M. Heuman, of Boiling Springs, a building automation technology major and a Veterans Affairs Work-Study employee in the Financial Aid Office, rises in support of his colleagues.
Jacob M. Heuman, of Boiling Springs, a building automation technology major and a Veterans Affairs Work-Study employee in the Financial Aid Office, rises in support of his colleagues.

Dennis L. Correll, associate dean for admissions and financial aid, adds a decorative touch to a tradition-in-progress.
Dennis L. Correll, associate dean for admissions and financial aid, adds a decorative touch to a tradition-in-progress.

Under close supervision of a General Services crew, Air Force veteran Kimberly A. Venti, financial aid specialist, takes to the skies to handle those hard-to-reach places.
Under close supervision of a General Services crew, Air Force veteran Kimberly A. Venti, financial aid specialist, takes to the skies to handle those hard-to-reach places.

A brief pause for photographs, then back to work ...
A brief pause for photographs, then back to work …

... so the dazzling results can be seen at moonrise.
… so the dazzling results can be seen at moonrise.

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