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Cool Cars, Casual Cuisine Form Backdrop for Faculty-Student Interaction

Grillmaster Colin W. Williamson, dean of transportation technology
Grillmaster Colin W. Williamson, dean of transportation technology
A special pair of eye-catching Mustangs are displayed by Cranmer's Auto, Hughesville.
A special pair of eye-catching Mustangs are displayed by Cranmer’s Auto, Hughesville.
Christopher H. Van Stavoren, associate professor of automotive technology, photographs a 1909 Chalmers on loan to the new auto-restoration major.
Christopher H. Van Stavoren, associate professor of automotive technology, photographs a 1909 Chalmers on loan to the new auto-restoration major.
Brett A. Reasner, assistant dean of transportation technology, serves students.
Brett A. Reasner, assistant dean of transportation technology, serves students.
Attracting considerable attention is a Mustang – fittingly owned by John R. Cuprisin, an associate professor in the Ford ASSET program.
Attracting considerable attention is a Mustang – fittingly owned by John R. Cuprisin, an associate professor in the Ford ASSET program.

Hot rods and hot dogs were the joint attraction at lunchtime Friday, as the School of Transportation Technology hosted an informal reception outside the Parkes Automotive Technology Center. Drawn by free hot dogs – and vehicles displayed by students, faculty and others – automotive technology and collision repair majors had the opportunity to meet classmates as well as their academic advisers. A similar get-together is scheduled for Monday at the Lumley Aviation Center in Montoursville.

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