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College’s Baja Entry Finishes Strong Amid Esteemed Field

Pennsylvania College of Technology students bested scores of schools at Baja SAE Maryland over the weekend.

The Penn College team posted top 10 showings in three events, including the demanding four-hour endurance race. The competition attracts approximately 100 college and university teams from across the world, who design and build a dune-buggy-like vehicle to survive various performance tests.

The Penn College No. 9 car elicits fan support at Baja SAE Maryland.
The Penn College No. 9 car elicits fan support at Baja SAE Maryland.

Penn College finished fifth in maneuverability and 10th in acceleration at the competition held in Mechanicsville, Maryland. In the marquee event – the four-hour endurance race over rough terrain – Penn College was seventh. The result was the seventh top 10 finish for Penn College in the endurance race since 2012. Once again, the Penn College students topped teams from renowned institutions in the endurance race, such as Notre Dame, Bucknell, New York University, Northwestern, Michigan State, Georgia Institute of Technology, Virginia Tech, Clemson and George Washington.

“I’m very proud of how our students performed against the best teams in the world,” said John G. Upcraft, instructor of manufacturing and machining and adviser for Penn College’s Baja SAE Club. “They continue to make a name for themselves throughout the Baja SAE community. We hope to do even better next time. Our students are fired up and can’t wait to get back in that car.”

The wait won’t be long. Penn College will compete at Baja SAE Kansas from May 17-20.

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