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College Joins Global ‘Hour of Code’ to Inspire Future Programmers

Pennsylvania College of Technology hosted about 130 high school students on Dec. 4 as part of the international “Hour of Code” initiative.

Hour of Code is a global movement by Computer Science Education Week and Code.org, reaching tens of millions of students in more than 180 countries through a one-hour introduction to computer science and computer programming.

At Penn College, students from Commonwealth Charter Academy, Montgomery Area High School, Muncy Junior/Senior High School, North Penn-Liberty High School, Warren County Career Center and Wyalusing Valley High School attended an event that introduced not only coding, but problem-solving, creativity and logic.

Alicia McNett, instructor of computer information technology at Penn College, guides a high school student in programming an Ozobot. The workshop was part of an “Hour of Code” event hosted by Penn College and attended by several high schools. It is part of an international initiative to encourage interest and confidence in the skills needed to join the computer science workforce.
Alicia McNett, instructor of computer information technology at Penn College, guides a high school student in programming an Ozobot. The workshop was part of an “Hour of Code” event hosted by Penn College and attended by several high schools. It is part of an international initiative to encourage interest and confidence in the skills needed to join the computer science workforce.

“These are skills that are heavily used in the information technology world, but also in pretty much every career you can think of,” said Bradley M. Webb, assistant dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies.

Their experience entailed coding without technology and coding with Ozobots, led by Anita R. Wood, associate professor of computer information technology, and Alicia McNett, instructor of computer information technology, as well as campus tours.

The Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code,” to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has since become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science. It takes place each year during Computer Science Education Week, which in 2017 is Dec. 4-10.

The Penn College event was hosted by its School of Business & Hospitality and School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

Penn College offers bachelor’s degrees in information assurance and cyber security, information technology: network specialist concentration, information technology sciences: gaming and simulation, software development and information management, and web and interactive media. It offers an associate degree in information technology: technical support technology emphasis.

To learn more information technology majors at Penn College, call 570-327-4520.

For information about Penn College, a national leader in applied technology education and workforce development, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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