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College Hosts Camps for High Schoolers Interested in Health Careers

Pennsylvania College of Technology nursing students Jessica K. Lilley, left, of Lewisburg, and Sue A. Gigunito, of Montoursville, demonstrate how to use a lift to transfer a patient from a wheelchair to a bed during Health Careers Camp at the college. (Photo by Nate Smyth, assistant dean of health sciences)Pennsylvania College of Technology hosted nearly 50 high school students on its campus on June 16-17 to learn about a variety of health careers.

The college’s School of Health Sciences offered two activities: Health Careers Camp and EMT-Paramedic Camp, both of which were open to students entering grades nine to 12. The camps offered hands-on workshops and opportunities to network with Penn College students and faculty, as well as working professionals in the health-care industry.

Health Careers Campers spent two days rotating through a number of workshops in the School of Health Sciences’ laboratories, followed by a field trip to Susquehanna Health facilities in Williamsport to observe health professionals in action. They explored careers in dental hygiene, nursing, occupational therapy assistant, paramedic technology, physician assistant, physical fitness specialist, radiography and surgical technology.

The annual Health Careers Camp is co-sponsored by Susquehanna Health.

“Through Susquehanna Health’s generous support, we were able to offer an educational and popular event to students interested in entering the health field,” said Nate Smyth, assistant dean of health sciences at the college.

Literally hands-on is this rope-rescue exercise at EMT-Paramedic Camp. (Photo by Mark Mark Trueman, director of paramedic technology programs)During the EMT-Paramedic Camp, the high school students participated in hands-on workshops that introduced them to a variety of emergency medical skills, including basic first aid and CPR certification, as well as advanced life-saving skills such as airway management, cardiac monitoring, vehicle rescue, rope rescue, and self-contained breathing apparatus.

In addition, a Geisinger Life Flight helicopter made a landing on campus and joined with Susquehanna Regional EMS/Susquehanna Health paramedic units to provide campers a chance to tour the helicopter and ambulances and interact with the paramedics and pilot.

The EMT-Paramedic Camp is funded in part by a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Health through the Lycoming County Department of Public Safety.

“The Pennsylvania Department of Health and Lycoming County Department of Public Safety’s financial support of the camp, along with Geisinger Medical Center and Susquehanna Health’s provision of emergency units and healthcare professionals, demonstrates a regional commitment with Pennsylvania College of Technology to promote emergency services as an exciting career with opportunities to grow,” said Mark Trueman, director of paramedic technology programs at the college.

To learn more about majors offered by the School of Health Sciences at Penn College, call 570-327-4519 or visit online .

For general information about the college, visit on the Web , e-mail or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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