News about Collision Repair & Restoration

Students ‘soldier’ on to complete project by ceremonial deadline

The toy soldier takes shape in College Avenue Labs ...

... where a focused group of students worked against the clock to fabricate and assemble a splendid keepsake.

Students and Klinger (standing at front left) proudly display their handiwork.

Standing at attention outside the Breuder Advanced Technology & Health Sciences Center, the majestic creation would be equally at home in the finest Manhattan storefront.

Penn College’s decades-old tradition of large-scale holiday cards on the campus mall got an impressive add-on for the 2018 season: a massive toy soldier jointly fashioned by automotive restoration majors and manufacturing students in instructor Roy Klinger’s metal-shaping classes. “We were trying to think of something we could build to go with the holiday cards, and we came across an image of a 12-foot-tall toy soldier,” said Arthur M. Wright IV, an automotive restoration technology major from Woodbridge, New Jersey. “We figured we would give it a try because it could end up looking really cool!” A group of students from the manufacturing program assisted restoration majors with drawing and designing the toy soldier. The inner structure is mostly plywood arranged to help support the weight of the towering statue, Wright said, while the outer shell is completely made of aluminum. “The restoration students made paper patterns of the shapes provided by the drawing that the manufacturing students prepared for us,” he explained. “We then shaped all the pieces using the skills and techniques that we were learning in our metal-shaping class. The project really helped us display the skills that we had been working so hard to develop.” It was a total team effort to complete the project, he said, estimating that it took all of four three-hour classes to fully realize their shared vision. “When we came in the Wednesday morning of the card-lighting ceremony (Nov. 28), we didn’t think we were going to be able to get it done,” said Wright, who also shared some of the students’ photos. “Most of the soldier was still in pieces, with no paint. But thanks to the guidance and leadership of our teacher, we were able to get everything finished before the ceremony started!”

Dent Fix donates aluminum repair station to Penn College

Penn College students and collision repair instructor Shaun D. Hack (in black shirt) listen as Daniel L. Maloney Jr., national sales director for Dent Fix Equipment and a member of the college’s Collision Repair Advisory Committee, demonstrates a donated aluminum dent-repair station.

Reflecting the increasing use of aluminum by automakers and affirming the value of Pennsylvania College of Technology’s industry partners, Dent Fix Equipment has donated a self-contained aluminum dent-repair station for use by the institution’s collision repair and automotive restoration students.

“This equipment package provides all the necessary tools to complete aluminum repairs to an industry standard,” said Shaun D. Hack, instructor of collision repair. “This adds value to the collision repair technology, collision repair technician and automotive restoration technology majors by adding skill sets that will be desired by potential employers.”

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Ford Thunderbird donated to college’s restoration major

Students and instructor Roy H. Klinger (second from left at rear) surround the Thunderbird in Penn College’s automotive restoration lab.

A 1956 Ford Thunderbird convertible has been given to Pennsylvania College of Technology by a Monroe County man who owned it for nearly 50 years.

Paul Hoffman, of Saylorsburg, donated the vintage vehicle – in its original Peacock Blue – for use by automotive restoration technology students.

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State Senate Appropriations Committee chair tours campus

Always engaged and advocating for the college, Yaw (right) converses with Browne in the atrium of the Breuder Advanced Technology & Health Sciences Center.

State Sen. Patrick M. Browne, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, visited Pennsylvania College of Technology on Thursday.

Browne, who represents the 16th District – which includes Allentown and other municipalities within Lehigh County – came to campus after presenting an election and legislative update at a breakfast sponsored by the Williamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Commerce.

He was invited by fellow Appropriations Committee member Sen. Gene Yaw, who also serves as chairman of the Penn College Board of Directors. Yaw also hosted the Chamber legislative update event, held at the Genetti Hotel in Williamsport.

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Alexanders Donate Model T to Automotive Restoration Program

Aubrey Alexander (front row, left) and brother Adam (front row, right) deliver a 1926 Ford Model T to students and faculty outside College Avenue Labs, home to Penn College’s automotive restoration and collision repair majors.

A 1926 Ford Model T, traded to Alexander Nissan in 2013 by its Picture Rocks owner, has been passed on to Pennsylvania College of Technology students for use in a variety of automotive labs.

Blaise Alexander Family Dealerships donated the historic vehicle that was recently offloaded onto main campus, accompanied by brothers Adam and Aubrey Alexander.

“We appreciate this gift to our automotive restoration program from the Alexanders. In addition to value for our students in their curricular work, it serves as a way to engage prospective students in the restoration major,” said Elizabeth A. Biddle, the college’s director of corporate relations. “Our goal is to foster the interest in antique cars and the restoration industry among young people.”

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Corvette Club Initiates Another Scholarship Fund at Penn College

Members of the Susquehanna Valley Corvette Club deliver a scholarship check and join the four latest Penn College students to receive awards from the fund. From left are Ray Harmon; students Jordan W. Boop, of Williamsport, and Logan K. VanBlargan, of Bloomsburg; Kim Walker; students Alex H. Romas, of Collegeville, and Brady K. Collins, of Catawissa; Al Clapps, chair of the club’s car show committee; Bill Alsted; Paul Butters; Jim Campbell; Dave Cappa; Ed Moore and Jack McDermott.

Students in a variety of automotive and collision repair majors at Pennsylvania College of Technology will be eligible for financial assistance from a second scholarship fund established by the Susquehanna Valley Corvette Club.

Annual awards from the Susquehanna Valley Corvette Club Foundation Endowed Scholarship Fund will be made to first-year students enrolled full time in the college’s automotive technology, automotive service sales and marketing, collision repair technology, or automotive restoration technology major.

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Restoration Students Skillfully Leave Mark on Automotive History

Looking much as it did for its 1947 debut, the "Tin Goose" precursor to the Tucker production model awaits its anniversary ride.

Faculty and students from Pennsylvania College of Technology’s automotive restoration major are traveling with one of America’s most historically significant vehicles on a “dream come true” journey to the Super Bowl of car shows: the prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in California.

The team preserved the 1947 Tucker prototype, nicknamed the “Tin Goose,” which is on loan from the William E. Swigart Jr. Automobile Museum in Huntingdon and archived at the Library of Congress for its importance in automotive lore.

Five automotive restoration technology students who worked on the car are making the trip for the Aug. 26 event: Adam J. Davis, of Doylestown; Conner W. Desforge, of Martinsburg, West Virginia; Joshua E. Marr, of Shickshinny; Tucker C. Watson, of Skowhegan, Maine; and Erik W. Weigle, of Linden. They will be accompanied by Roy H. Klinger, instructor of collision repair, and Robert K. Vlacich, assistant professor of automotive service.

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Fanciful Signpost Takes Shape Outside CAL

At Penn College, the end of the road is just the beginning!

No detail is spared in the rustic recreation.

Sunlight plays off the silky flow of water.

Fittingly pointing the way to related instructional space – and cleverly mirroring Penn College’s evolution from yesterday to tomorrow – a pondless water feature outside College Avenue Labs affirms that “everything old is new again.” A broken-down truck forms the centerpiece of the tableau, created by several departments within General Services and completed Wednesday. “The idea of the 1949 Dodge came from seeing some old trucks used as landscape markers with seasonal interest in them: flowers in the spring, mums in the fall, evergreen clippings in the winter,” said Andrea L. Mull, horticulturist/grounds and motorpool supervisor. “We wanted to make a landmark that would show where the automotive restoration and collision repair labs are. All we have to do now is tell people to go to the building where the old Dodge truck is located!” A course of 2RC limestone simulates the old road that the vehicle supposedly was traveling as it approached a hill with a load of mountain stone. The engine died … the truck remained … and Mother Nature took possession, evidenced by the tree growing up through the bed. The truck was purchased from Bill Lee Jr., of Jersey Shore; the aged lettering was done by Todd Moore, student affairs marketing specialist; and the clear coat (to slow the weathering process) was applied by collision repair instructor Roy H. Klinger.

Restored Mustang Again Showcased by AACA Museum in Hershey

AACA Museum highlights students' handiwork

A carefully refurbished 1965 Ford Mustang, the genesis of Penn College’s automotive restoration technology major, is back on display at the Antique Automobile Club of America Museum in Hershey. “We support the future of the automotive restoration industry and we are pleased to include this exhibit,” museum officials noted in a newsletter announcement. “The Mustang featured in this exhibit was restored by Penn College students as part of our ongoing collaborative partnership.” The award-winning work by students, performed during the 2009-10 school year, directly led to a popular associate-degree program through which the technicians of tomorrow research and restore the priceless vehicles of yesteryear. The exhibit is sponsored by the Members 1st Federal Credit Union.

College’s Restoration Camp Featured in National Classic-Car Blog

Penn College’s second annual Automotive Restoration Camp, to be offered June 17-20, is featured in a recent edition of Hemmings Daily. As instructor Roy H. Klinger points out in the article, “auto restoration spans a range of disciplines,” and the camp is the best way to give those considering a future in the trade a sampling of each. The overnight camp – among the array of engaging opportunities to be held on campus – will include introductions to upholstery, metalforming and sheet-metal working; hands-on instruction in pinstriping and use of the paint simulator; and a spin in the college-owned Ford Model T. Attendees will also enjoy a field trip to the Eagles Mere Auto Museum in nearby Sullivan County, which houses roughly 75 cars from the 1950s and ’60s, and, in addition to knowledge gained, can take home their upholstery and metal-shaping projects.
Automotive Restoration Camp is filled, but a waiting list is being compiled should vacancies arise.

Spring Car Show Pays Tribute, Renews Tradition

PCMA members display their Autocross Pontiac Fiero.

Inventive student-made trophies include an award in memory of Larry B. Leavitt, who died in January after 20 years as an automotive faculty member.

Members of the college's Diesel Performance Club offer up a work-in-progress: a 1959 Mack B model with triple turbochargers.

Loren R. Bruckhart, collision repair instructor and department head, with his Dodge Charger

A student-entered "Rat Rod"

The sun shone on Saturday’s Spring Car Show, sponsored by the Penn College Motorsports Association and Penn College Classic Cruisers. Proceeds from the third annual event, held on the Carl Building Technologies Center parking lot, benefited both clubs and the American Cancer Society.
Photos by Brett A. Reasner, dean of transportation and natural resources technologies

Vintage Vehicle Makes History as Show’s First Collegiate Winner

Owner Patricia B. Swigart (left) is among those enjoying a ride with driver Luke C. Miller across the grounds of the illustrious Amelia Island event.

A 1908 Studebaker electric car, owned by the William E. Swigart Jr. Automobile Museum in Huntingdon and restored at Pennsylvania College of Technology, was recognized with an award at Florida’s prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance earlier this month – the first student project ever judged at the renowned show.

Affectionately known as “Tommy,” the vehicle was one of a pair that shuttled federal legislators to and from the U.S. Capitol shortly after the turn of the 20th century. It was honored with an Amelia Award in the Horseless Carriage (Electric) category, coinciding with the show’s celebration of a technology that has re-emerged in today’s automobiles.

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Students Travel Across Curricular Boundaries in Vintage Vehicle

A 1908 Studebaker is surrounded by Penn College students and faculty instrumental in its functional fine-tuning for a prestigious show in Amelia Island, Fla. From left are Keith H. English, instructor of machine tool technology and automated manufacturing; student Alex M. Koser, of Mount Joy; Christopher H. Van Stavoren, assistant automotive professor; student Andrew B. Moyer, of Hughesville; Roy H. Klinger, automotive restoration instructor; students Benjamin T. Steimling, of Danville, Kevin S. Kyle, of Hatboro, and Michael R. Krukowski, of Fairfax Station, Va.; Eric K. Albert, associate professor of machine tool technology and automated manufacturing; and student Luke C. Miller, of Grasonville, Md. Steimling is an engineering design technology major; the other students are all enrolled in automotive restoration technology.

An interdisciplinary collaboration at Pennsylvania College of Technology applied three-dimensional printing to a singular piece of American history, readying an electric 1908 Studebaker for display at a prestigious international automobile show in Florida.

Students and faculty in additive manufacturing and automotive restoration classes, based in separate academic schools but housed under the same College Avenue Labs roof, joined forces in prepping the vehicle for transport to the 23rd annual Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance from March 9-11.

While the college has made its presence known at a number of high-profile venues, this is its first trip to Amelia Island – considered one of the year’s most significant automobile shows.

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Student Awarded $1,500 Scholarship From Antique Auto Group

Penn College student Hallie Krala celebrates her scholarship award with Preston T. Rose, who earned a two-year degree in automotive restoration technology last year. Krala, of Williamsport, is set to graduate from the same major in May.

An automotive restoration technology student scheduled to graduate from Pennsylvania College of Technology in May has received a $1,500 scholarship from the Antique Automobile Club of America.

Hallie Krala, of Williamsport, was presented with the Louise Bianchi Chiotti Memorial Scholarship Award during AACA’s 82nd annual meeting. The event, sponsored this year by the organization’s Hershey Region, was held Feb. 8-10 at the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel.

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Penn College to Again Make Impression on Farm Show Attendees

Students in Penn College’s hospitality majors join their instructor, Chef Michael J. Ditchfield, on the Culinary Connection stage at the Pennsylvania Farm Show last January.

Hundreds of thousands of visitors will soon flock to the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex & Expo Center to celebrate the commonwealth’s leading industry, and Pennsylvania College of Technology students and employees will be on hand for an interactive peek into the real-world applications of “degrees that work.”

“A beloved tradition of Penn College, the Pennsylvania Farm Show continues to be the highlight of the new year. During the weeklong festivities, members of Admissions, Alumni Relations and Academic Affairs bring Penn College to Harrisburg and showcase all of the amazing opportunities that await students on campus,” said Claire Z. Biggs, coordinator of admissions events and services. “Through our interactive and hands-on activities, we hope that friends of the college will come to learn what makes applied technology education so special.”

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Penn College is a special mission affiliate of Penn State