News about Students

Life Flight Maintenance Doesn’t Pre-Empt Learning Opportunity

Health Sciences students traveled to Williamsport Regional Airport, where one of Geisinger's Life Flight helicopters was being serviced.

Students in the paramedic technician and emergency medical services majors visited the hangar for Geisinger’s Life Flight helicopter on Wednesday, where the three-person crew gave them an overview of its services and talked about safety protocols when on the scene of a Life Flight landing. Each year, as part of a summer Operations and Rescue Practices for the Paramedic course, students learn about crime scene awareness, medical incident command and emergency vehicle operations, including a landing by Life Flight and hands-on Emergency Vehicle Driver Training. On Wednesday, because the helicopter was undergoing a parts replacement, the Penn College students visited the helicopter at its hangar at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville. There, flight medic Kevin Niedzwiecki, a part-time instructor at Penn College, and other crew members provided insight and a hands-on demonstration. The photo was provided by Andrew L. Mattocks, a part-time Penn College instructor and Life Flight employee (and full-time ICU nurse) who received Penn College degrees in paramedic technology (’06), applied health studies (’11) and nursing (’17) and provided an on-campus lecture in fight operations earlier this summer.

Volvo Video Celebrates Corporate Support of Education

Grouped near a Volvo excavator at the training site, alongside the West Branch of the Susquehanna River south of the Schneebeli Earth Science Center, are (from left): Flood, Breon, Peck, Hoffman, Witmer and Justin W. Beishline, assistant dean of transportation and natural resources technologies.

Peck (center) and Hoffman talk with Amy Crouse, Volvo Construction Equipment's product marketing and communication specialist.

Getting it on record, the crew talks with Flood ...

... and captures Witmer's hands-on perspective from behind the controls.

A long-standing partnership between Penn College and Volvo, emblematic of the corporate support that helps provide all six of the institution’s academic schools with relevant technology and laboratory tools, is extolled in a newly posted YouTube video filmed in May at the college’s heavy equipment training site in Brady Township. The visit by a crew from Volvo Construction Equipment in Shippensburg was arranged by Brian Hoffman, regional manager of Highway Equipment & Supply Co., itself a longtime supporter of students and faculty in the college’s School of Transportation & Natural Resources Technologies. Interviewed on camera at the work site were Makenzie E. Witmer, of Bellefonte, and Tyler M. Breon, of Millheim, both majoring in heavy construction equipment technology: operator emphasis; Ryan W. Peck, instructor of diesel equipment technology; and Highway Equipment’s Ryan Flood, a member of the college’s Heavy Construction Equipment Technician Emphasis Advisory Committee.

Students in Cast of CTL’s Summer Youth Production

Courtlyn A. Trautman"Legally Blonde: The Musical"Jasmine E. Silver Two Penn College students are in the cast of “Legally Blonde: The Musical,” running Thursday through Sunday at the Community Theatre League. Based on the crowd-pleasing 2001 movie, the award-winning show follows the transformation of Delta Nu sorority sister Elle Woods as she tackles stereotypes, snobbery and scandal in pursuit of her dreams at Harvard Law School. Among those performing on the 100 W. Third St. theater’s Mainstage are Courtlyn A. Trautman, of Herndon, graduating next month in health arts: practical nursing emphasis, portraying Paulette, and Jasmine E. Silver, a legal assistant-paralegal major from Montoursville, part of the ensemble/Greek chorus. “Legally Blonde: The Musical” will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for students.

Vital Blood Drive Set for Sept. 6-7 in Penn’s Inn

Red Cross blood drive scheduled for Sept. 6-7It’s a terrible scenario for patients and doctors alike: An emergency team rushes a patient to the hospital for lifesaving treatment only to find that there isn’t enough blood on hand. In an emergency when every second counts, a delay in the delivery of blood could potentially mean very bad news for someone in need. The Penn College community can help prevent such an awful situation and end the current nationwide Red Cross shortage, which is worsened by regular blood donors’ fewer appointments during the summer. Join College Health Services and the American Red Cross from noon-6 p.m. Sept. 6-7 in Penn’s Inn (Bush Campus Center, second floor). Online appointments to contribute to this crucial mission are available, and each donor will receive a $15 gift certificate redeemable online with hundreds of popular merchants.

Voices of Experience Guide Incoming Students, Families

Excitement, engagement register on the faces of incoming first-year students.

President Davie Jane Gilmour welcomes new students and their families to Penn College.

Alexis J. Medero, a civil engineering technology major from Levittown, shares some peer-to-peer insight during a get-acquainted session in Klump Academic Center.

Anthony J. Pace, director of student activities, introduces the student Links to the audience.

Putting incoming students at ease with a soothing smile and a now-traditional activity, Alexandra D. Petrizzi prepares to circulate a beach ball covered with conversational prompts. A graphic design major from Langhorne, the Connections Link facilitated the sharing of students' passions and pop-culture preferences.

Penn College’s summer orientation program – fittingly named Connections – will resume Monday with four more two-day sessions to introduce newcomers to  campus and help them prepare for next month’s start of classes. “The Student Activities Office, with the help of our Links, has welcomed a fantastic group of new students and their guests to campus for the Connections program,” said Anthony J. Pace, director, “and we look forward to continuing to do so throughout the remainder of the summer.” The coming weeks’ schedule also includes a pair of one-day gatherings for adult learners and transfer students, respectively.
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer

Eight Penn College Students Medal in National Competition

SkillsUSA

Eight students from the widest variety of academic majors ever to represent Pennsylvania College of Technology at the National Leadership and Skills Conference returned home with medals – including first-time successes in three competitive areas.

The contingent took one of three top places in five categories, and this year marked the first time that Penn College entrants medaled in Computer Programming, TeamWorks and Welding Sculpture.

“This really goes to show how well-prepared the students are from their respective fields and how great our instructors are here at the college. This is, by far, the most diverse group of students I’ve had go to the national competition,” said SkillsUSA adviser James N. Colton II, an assistant professor of welding. “The national skills competition gives us a chance to showcase our technical skills and show everyone why we’re a leader in applied technology.”

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Restaurant Again Favored Among Area Newspaper’s Readers

Michael R. Triassi, Le Jeune Chef’s director of sales and restaurant operations, receives a silver Reader’s Choice Award from Becky Fitzwater, an advertising representative for the Milton Standard-Journal.

For the second year, Le Jeune Chef Restaurant has received silver honors in the Milton Standard-Journal’s annual Reader’s Choice Awards. The Standard-Journal ran a Reader’s Choice contest form in its daily newspapers and provided ballots to local businesses for submission by their patrons. Voters could also fill out ballots online and write in additional categories. Becky Fitzwater, an advertising representative for the newspaper, delivered a certificate to the restaurant on Friday, signifying that it was the second-highest vote-getter in the Best Restaurant category. Le Jeune Chef presents a fine-dining experience hosted by Penn College’s School of Business & Hospitality. The restaurant offers a gourmet menu, much of it prepared by students, and features the area’s most extensive wine list. The full list of award winners will be announced in the newspaper in July. To make a reservation, call 570-320-CHEF (570-320-2433). To view menus and special events, visit the restaurant’s website.
Photo by Anna C. Miller, marketing and communications specialist for the School of Business & Hospitality

Links Eager to Tell Orientation Guests, ‘Let’s Get Connected!’

Connections Links (from left): Lindsey A. King, Hanover, pre-applied health studies: occupational therapy assistant concentration; Kylee A. Kalnas, Easton, pre-applied health studies: occupational therapy assistant concentration; Emily K. Conklin, Port Allegany, pre-dental hygiene; Margo L. Rudy, Hollidaysburg, pre-radiography; Raymond L. Long, Forest City, building automation technology; David A. Gadalla, Carlisle, aviation maintenance technology; Alexis J. Medero, Levittown, civil engineering technology; Nathaniel H. Lyon, Fredericksburg, welding & fabrication engineering technology; Alexandra D. Petrizzi, Langhorne, graphic design; and Cera N. Blunk, Schuylkill Haven, physician assistant.

Rocking it out at The Rock, the Links are ready to roll.

The Summer 2017 Connections Links are primed to encourage new students and their families as they prepare for college by attending Penn College’s “Connections” orientation program, kicking off next week and running through July 25. Six two-day sessions for first-year students and two one-day sessions for adult learners and transfer students offer a comprehensive overview of campus life and academic expectations. The 10 Connections Links, knowledgeable and enthusiastic student leaders, are ready to facilitate networking sessions and answer plenty of questions.

Penn College Becomes Full Member of NCAA Division III

A new era in athletics

Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Wildcat Athletics teams will compete as full members of NCAA Division III when students return this fall.

The NCAA Division III Management Council notified Penn College on Thursday that it has successfully completed the provisional membership process. As a full NCAA Division III member, the college will be eligible to compete for national championships and will have voting rights on NCAA legislation.

“This is wonderful news for Wildcat Athletics and for Penn College,” President Davie Jane Gilmour said. “Full Division III membership will help us attract more student-athletes. These students enter our gates with a heightened sense of grit and drive, and we know that Penn College student-athletes find the competition, discipline and teamwork required of a collegiate athlete integral to their record of success as leaders in their chosen professions.

“The college’s work toward full NCAA membership has already injected a welcome boost to campus spirit, which was on full display when we recently introduced our new Wildcat Athletic logo to a capacity crowd of students, faculty and staff. I want to commend everyone at the institution who played a role in moving this process forward.”

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College’s Baja Team Finds Victory, Validation in Illinois

Team members standing in front of a massive Caterpillar D11 bulldozer manufactured nearby are (from left) Mark A. Turek, Travis Scholtz, Darian P. Trego, Shujaa AlQahtani, Trevor M. Clouser, Logan B. Goodhart, Nathan M. Eckstein, Johnathan T. Capps, John D. Kleinfelter, Matthew J. Nyman and Clinton R. Bettner. Not pictured are Michael A. Oldroyd-Costello and faculty adviser John G. Upcraft.

Capps drives the #93 car to another commanding Penn College finish.

Penn College’s Baja SAE team turned in another fifth-place performance during an endurance competition in Illinois on Saturday, duplicating last month’s impressive effort in Kansas and finishing a personal-best ninth in the overall standings. “We had another flawless race,” said John G. Upcraft, instructor of manufacturing and machining and adviser for the college’s Baja SAE Club. “The team is pretty darned happy!” (The top four endurance teams were San Diego State University, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, the University of Akron and Oregon State University, respectively.) Not that there weren’t issues. The mud that marked the Pittsburg, Kansas, race was replaced by heavy winds and dust at the Caterpillar Edwards Demonstration and Learning Center in Peoria. What’s more, the transponders didn’t work during the live stream, causing an inaccurate leaderboard until the manual trackside count properly credited the team for all 59 of its laps. “But we didn’t wreck and nothing on the car broke. And for the first year,  some top teams told my guys what a good job they’re doing. This is a real engineering competition, and we haven’t always been as strong as we’d like in that area; we’re slowly getting there, and people are recognizing us as a top team.” On the basis of its finish, Penn College wins entry to the first race of next season. The college will be represented by the No. 9 car at Baja SAE Maryland, scheduled for April 26-29 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Watch PCToday for more on the Baja SAE team’s phenomenal finale to its season.
Photos provided

Students Gain ‘Tons’ of Hospitality Experience at Iconic Event

Penn College culinary arts and systems students R. Colby Janowitz, of Westminster, Md.; Amaris T. Smith, of Williamsport; and Cy C. Heller, of Milton, work an à la carte lunch in the Turf Room on Oaks Day at Churchill Downs.

Pennsylvania College of Technology students returned from the 2017 Kentucky Derby with a wealth of experience in high-volume hospitality, courtesy of Churchill Downs food operator Levy Restaurants.

“Working at the Kentucky Derby was an insane, amazing, life-changing experience,” said R. Colby Janowitz, who received both a bachelor’s degree in culinary arts and systems and an associate degree in hospitality management from Penn College in May. It was the second trip to the Kentucky Derby for the Westminster, Maryland, native.

Janowitz joined 24 other Penn College students – and faculty member Charles R. Niedermyer, instructor of baking and pastry arts/culinary arts – in the kitchens of Churchill Downs during Derby Week, a series of events that culminates in the storied Kentucky Derby, which this year drew a crowd of 158,000.

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Culinary Student Featured on ‘Home & Backyard’ Series

Peirce A. Connelly

Culinary arts and systems student Peirce A. Connelly was featured on Saturday’s episode of WNEP’s “Home & Backyard” television series, sharing well-learned kitchen tips. Host Jackie Lewandowski visited Front Street Station in Northumberland, where Connelly is completing an internship. During the seven-minute segment, the young chef, who’s been working at Front Street Station for more than seven years, discussed the restaurant’s offerings and showed his kitchen know-how while he taught viewers to prepare chicken cacciatore, a Front Street Station specialty. “I am studying under the kitchen manager as well as the owner, learning things ‘that they won’t teach you in culinary school,’ as (the) owner would say. But in all reality, the school most certainly set me up for success,” Connelly said. “I am learning how we do our ordering, purchasing and recovering, prepping for banquets, coming up with specials, as well general line-cook duties. I am very glad that Penn College allowed me to do my internship at the place I had been working.” Connelly’s “on-camera” work as a student has also included helping with demonstrations on the Culinary Connection stage at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. Connelly, of Northumberland, plans to graduate in August.

Students Follow Nature’s Way to Trust, Triumph

Pairs of students climb pole ladders with a goal of walking across the log at the top (and crossing each other “mid-span”). Students on the ground control the belay (safety) ropes for the climbers.

Also at CLIMBucknell, students use aluminum beams and tree stumps to cross an imaginary “lava field” without leaving a team member behind or falling into “the lava” …

... and transcend a more “vertical” challenge: a multi-story high-climbing tower.

The therapeutic value of quiet, mindfulness, meditation and focus are found on a hike at Rider Park.

On the Penn College campus, HSR330 students learn to trust and communicate through alternate means as they work in pairs, wordlessly guiding a blindfolded partner through a course covering different obstacles.

Nature as therapy was the lesson learned recently by students enrolled in Outdoor Recreation as a Therapeutic Tool (HSR 330). The students also learned firsthand how to facilitate individual and team-based outdoor activities. One day, the group visited Bucknell University’s CLIMBucknell Challenge Course, an outdoor educational facility in Cowan. “Under the guidance of the Bucknell facilitators, the Penn College students learned how to solve mental and physical challenges as a team,” said D. Robert Cooley, associate professor of anthropology/environmental science (who also provided the photos). “After the problem-solving games concluded, we moved to the ropes course where we all were able to push past our individual comfort zones on some breathtakingly high ropes elements, an enormous climbing wall, and finally, an impossibly long zip line. A great day was had by all!” Other outdoor educational venues folded into the students’ coursework during the summer “minimester” included Rider Park north of Williamsport and a beautiful location a little closer to “home” – the Penn College campus.

Subterranean Senatorial History Surfaces in Automotive Lab

Retired from legislative duty in 1912, when a faster monorail system ferried Washington, D.C., VIPs through a 760-foot tunnel, the 1908 Studebaker averaged 225 trips a day at the height of its civil service.

Students (joined at right by Klinger, instructor of collision repair) equip the handsome cherry-bodied vehicle with batteries which, but for increased storage capacity, are largely unchanged from the turn of the 20th century.

Because the car moved backward and forward along its "subway" route, the driver would switch seats to face the direction of travel.

While students donned gloves to work on the vehicle, a similar protective covering was placed on the vehicle's original Firestone tires.

Van Stavoren, an assistant automotive professor, works with restoration students Alex M. Koser (left), of Mount Joy, and Nicholas C. Howland, of Woodbridge, Va.

An electric 1908 Studebaker, one of two original vehicles built to shuttle passengers underground from the Old Senate Building to the U.S. Capitol (including such literal heavyweights as President William Howard Taft) is being prepped by students for a prestigious weekend event. The vehicles were nicknamed “Peg” and “Tommy” during their heyday; the former is on display at the Studebaker Museum in South Bend, Indiana, and the latter is on loan to Penn College from the William E. Swigart Jr. Automobile Museum in Huntingdon. Patricia B. Swigart, vehicle owner and one of the earliest supporters of the college’s automotive restoration technology major, has never seen “Tommy” operated under its own power – a situation that restoration students and faculty hope to remedy at the Elegance at Hershey this Friday through Sunday. Electrical students in Christopher H. Van Stavoren’s Introduction to Restoration Procedures course installed 10 batteries in the vehicle during a Tuesday class in the Parkes Automotive Technology Center. Faculty colleague Roy H. Klinger said the students’ involvement in researching and preserving the Studebaker will be documented by the Historic Vehicle Association, which recognizes the cultural significance of the automobile. Preston T. Rose, a May restoration graduate, researched a 1932 McGee Roadster that was recently displayed on the Washington Monument mall as part of the HVA’s national register of historic vehicles.

Faculty Member Named One of Top 10 Pastry Chefs in America

Niedermyer accepts applause as he's announced among the Top 10 honorees.

A Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member has received one of the highest honors bestowed on pastry chefs: a spot among Dessert Professional Magazine’s Top 10 Pastry Chefs in America.

Chef Charles R. Niedermyer, of State College, an instructor of baking and pastry arts and culinary arts, was named to the 2017 Top Ten list by Dessert Professional publisher Matthew Stevens and editor Tish Boyle, who selected honorees based on their talent, creativity, contributions to the industry and dedication to creating high-quality confections.

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Last updated June 6, 2017 | Posted in Alumni, Baking, Pastry & Culinary Arts, Business & Hospitality, Faculty & Staff, Students | This gallery contains 3 photos. | Tagged as | Leave a comment