News about Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications

‘Career Day’ Opens Doors of Exploration for Curious Teens

Automated manufacturing technology student Aren T. Way (right) of Jersey Shore, demonstrates an industrial-scale robot during a session on “Industrial Robotics, Hydraulics and Pneumatics, and CNC Machine Tools.”

More than 900 high schoolers, hailing from 28 school districts, spent Thursday on campus for the College Transitions Office’s Career Day. Faculty and students from all six of the college’s academic schools and all three campuses spent their Fall Break day off providing close to 50 career-exploration sessions for the visitors, exposing them to dozens of the college’s “degrees that work” offerings. A few of the districts traveled as much as two hours to attend. Among the highlights was a half-day session by the Penn College accounting, finance and business administration departments and the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants that featured not only information about Penn College’s technology-laden degrees, but talks by guest speakers Michael Colgan, CEO of PICPA, and Joseph Siebert, president of PICPA, about future work in these fields as firms must protect clients’ financial information, and accountants can aid investigations via “forensic accounting.” Following the presentations and a Q&A with a panel of Penn College accounting and finance students, the 200 high school participants attended an etiquette lunch in the Field House.

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Last updated October 13, 2017 | Posted in Business & Hospitality, College Transitions, Construction & Design Technologies, Events, Faculty & Staff, Health Sciences, Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies, Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications, Students, Transportation & Natural Resources Technologies | This gallery contains 19 photos. | Tagged as | Leave a comment

In Penn College Fashion, Student Puts Know-How to Use

Shakeem J. Thomas

Pennsylvania College of Technology students regularly apply their skills to help others – even before graduation.

That’s the case with Shakeem J. Thomas, an emergency management technology student from Brooklyn, New York, who’s lending a hand in the nearby Queens neighborhood of Broad Channel where residents are still recovering – five years later – from Hurricane Sandy. Working with CAC BHL Joint Venture, LLC, a company contracted under New York City’s “Build It Back” program, Thomas is helping with the rebuilding effort.

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Lecture, Reception Mark Continuation of Gallery Exhibit

Steven Brower

Projected images enhance an informative lecture by Brower, held in the SASC conference room ...

... just across Hagan Way from a companion exhibit on the third floor of Madigan Library.

His interest raised, a patron lowers his cellphone to get a photo in the college gallery.

The Penn College community attended a graphic design lecture and reception for a poster exhibit on Wednesday. The lecture, delivered by Steven Brower – an award-winning graphic designer, author and educator – was in the Student & Administrative Services Center’s first-floor presentation room. Among Brower’s works are books on legendary musicians Louis Armstrong and Woody Guthrie. The reception for the National Poster Retrospecticus followed in The Gallery at Penn College. The display of 100 posters, which runs through Oct. 11, includes pieces by nationally recognized artists as well as a collection of posters created by Penn College graphic design alumni (when they were students).
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer

Professor’s Physics Manual Brings Real-World Understanding to Subject

During a 2004 study abroad trip, LeBlanc (in white shirt) joins students at a cultural site in Japan. LeBlanc led six Penn College study abroad courses in Japan, where students visited Tsuyama National College of Technology. Photo courtesy of LeBlanc

From the Fall 2017 Penn College Magazine: Physics faculty member Joseph E. LeBlanc lived in three other nations before making his home at Penn College, where he finds creative ways to make physics meaningful to students. Read “Life’s Work.”

Award-Winning Documentary Series Explores Why Math Matters

Filming “Working Class: Game On! Why Math Matters” led Christopher J. Leigh, video production coordinator at Penn College, to scale a mountain in the Shawangunk Ridge, an internationally famous rock climbing area within the Mohonk Preserve in New York state. Leigh interacts with members of the Shawanpunk climbing team featured in the documentary.

Mountain climbers, a superhero and the legendary video game pioneer who founded Atari join with faculty to explain the importance of mathematics when Pennsylvania College of Technology’s award-winning public television series returns this fall.

“Working Class: Game On! Why Math Matters” explores the link between math, computers and technology and helps connect the study of math with real-world experiences that engage student interests.

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Math Matters: Atari Founder, Faculty Contend There’s a Better Way

At a Penn College Career Day, a middle-schooler learns the color-coded programming language that will make an Ozobot dance. (Photo by Tia G. La, student photographer)

From the Fall 2017 Penn College Magazine: If students don’t like math or aren’t grasping the concept, it’s the responsibility of educators to help them understand before they move on, Atari founder Nolan Bushnell contends. Penn College faculty in mathematics, electronics, and information technology provide insight on why math matters.

Students’ Little League Design Work to Be Seen by Millions

Penn College students Olivia J. Hawbecker, of Chambersburg, and Austin L. Fulton, of Montoursville, are serving internships at Little League International Headquarters, working behind the scenes on a variety of tasks related to the upcoming Little League Baseball World Series, which begins Aug. 17.

Two Pennsylvania College of Technology students are experiencing the monumental preparation and communication that occur in the months preceding the Little League Baseball World Series, and sharpening their skills as they help.

Austin L. Fulton, a graphic design student from Montoursville, and Olivia J. Hawbecker, a web and interactive media student from Chambersburg, are serving internships at Little League International Headquarters in South Williamsport, just a few miles from the Penn College campus.

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Brewing Up Some Major Promotion

Major swag: Glasses, openers and coasters promote the new brewing and fermentation science degree.

Pennsylvania College of Technology’s new brewing and fermentation science degree was highlighted at the Billtown Brewfest on Saturday. Held in downtown Williamsport at Midtown Landing, an area behind Trade and Transit Centre II, the festival featured 30 craft breweries offering tastings. Representatives from the college’s Admissions, Alumni Relations and Corporate Relations offices were on hand for the event, answering questions about the new major and greeting alumni in attendance. Also participating was Timothy L. Yarrington, instructor of brewing and fermentation science and an award-winning brewmaster, who visited with fellow brewers and promoted Penn College’s academic entry into the industry. “I thought it was a great event in a great location,” Yarrington said. “It was good to see so many of my brewing peers here in Williamsport and be able to taste so many great products. I enjoyed catching up with some old friends and also making some new ones. I look forward to this becoming an annual Williamsport tradition.” Organized by the Lycoming County Visitors Bureau and Brickyard Restaurant & Ale House, the celebration of craft beers offered two three-hour tastings and featured entertainment by two local bands – The No Maddz and The Family Ties. Penn College’s brewing and fermentation science degree begins this fall.

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Last updated July 24, 2017 | Posted in Admissions, Alumni, Brewing & Fermentation Science, Faculty & Staff, Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications | This gallery contains 8 photos. | Tagged as | Leave a comment

Eight Penn College Students Medal in National Competition

SkillsUSA

Eight students from the widest variety of academic majors ever to represent Pennsylvania College of Technology at the National Leadership and Skills Conference returned home with medals – including first-time successes in three competitive areas.

The contingent took one of three top places in five categories, and this year marked the first time that Penn College entrants medaled in Computer Programming, TeamWorks and Welding Sculpture.

“This really goes to show how well-prepared the students are from their respective fields and how great our instructors are here at the college. This is, by far, the most diverse group of students I’ve had go to the national competition,” said SkillsUSA adviser James N. Colton II, an assistant professor of welding. “The national skills competition gives us a chance to showcase our technical skills and show everyone why we’re a leader in applied technology.”

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Penn College Degree Leads to Philadelphia Eagles Front Office

Penn College web and interactive media alumnus Christopher C. Rutledge is employed by the Philadelphia Eagles as digital project coordinator.

Pennsylvania College of Technology graduate Christopher C. Rutledge, a collegiate soccer player and all-around sports enthusiast, chose his degree without imagining that it would lead to work that so closely relates to his lifelong pastime, let alone that his first full-time job would be with his favorite NFL team.

“Ever since I was 6 years of age, I have been in love with sports, and to this day, I still get myself involved with many activities, whether it is football, soccer, softball, etc.,” the 2016 graduate said.

Rutledge, a four-year member of the Penn College men’s soccer team, received a bachelor’s degree in web and interactive media. Last summer, he joined the Philadelphia Eagles’ front office as digital project coordinator.

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Students Follow Nature’s Way to Trust, Triumph

Pairs of students climb pole ladders with a goal of walking across the log at the top (and crossing each other “mid-span”). Students on the ground control the belay (safety) ropes for the climbers.

Also at CLIMBucknell, students use aluminum beams and tree stumps to cross an imaginary “lava field” without leaving a team member behind or falling into “the lava” …

... and transcend a more “vertical” challenge: a multi-story high-climbing tower.

The therapeutic value of quiet, mindfulness, meditation and focus are found on a hike at Rider Park.

On the Penn College campus, HSR330 students learn to trust and communicate through alternate means as they work in pairs, wordlessly guiding a blindfolded partner through a course covering different obstacles.

Nature as therapy was the lesson learned recently by students enrolled in Outdoor Recreation as a Therapeutic Tool (HSR 330). The students also learned firsthand how to facilitate individual and team-based outdoor activities. One day, the group visited Bucknell University’s CLIMBucknell Challenge Course, an outdoor educational facility in Cowan. “Under the guidance of the Bucknell facilitators, the Penn College students learned how to solve mental and physical challenges as a team,” said D. Robert Cooley, associate professor of anthropology/environmental science (who also provided the photos). “After the problem-solving games concluded, we moved to the ropes course where we all were able to push past our individual comfort zones on some breathtakingly high ropes elements, an enormous climbing wall, and finally, an impossibly long zip line. A great day was had by all!” Other outdoor educational venues folded into the students’ coursework during the summer “minimester” included Rider Park north of Williamsport and a beautiful location a little closer to “home” – the Penn College campus.

Stunning Tilework Masterfully Adds to ATHS’ Attractive Entranceway

Southern exposure: The artist stands over a striking addition to the ATHS.

Stabley's original sketch lies atop plastic containers of mosaic tile.

The mosaic’s angles mimic the atrium’s skylight.

Stabley works on taping prior to grouting the piece.

Thousands of artistic pieces, set to inspire

Penn College’s main campus is home to yet another magnificent mosaic, designed and crafted by David A. Stabley, instructor of ceramics and wood sculpture. On Friday, Stabley put the finishing touches on the piece, gracing the atrium of the Breuder Advanced Technology & Health Sciences Center. The atrium’s walls recently received a fresh coat of green paint, and the mosaic’s green and brown hues complement the surroundings. The artwork took Stabley less than two weeks to install. He was assisted by Roza Breneisen. Stabley hopes to add mosaic enhancements to the atrium’s second-floor walkway “walls” that bookend the current piece. A number of other Stabley-created mosaic installations can be found around campus, including the Capitol Eatery, and on the walls of the Hager Lifelong Education Center and the Physician Assistant Center.

Faculty Member to Exhibit Chain-Mail Jewelry at June’s ‘First Friday’

Faculty member among First Friday artists

Joseph E. LeBlanc, an assistant professor of physics at Penn College, will be among the local artisans displaying their craft during First Friday (June 2) in downtown Williamsport. LeBlanc, who uses classic weave patterns in his creations, has been making chain mail since 2013. His work can be seen at Gustonian Gifts, 357 Pine St.

Adjunct Faculty Member Coaching Finals-Bound OM Team

Denise A. Southard (standing in back) and her husband, Bret, pose with some of their Odyssey of the Mind mentees.

After capturing first in both regional and state competitions, the Curtin crew heads to OM World Finals.

A Penn College adjunct math faculty member and her team of fourth- and fifth-graders from Curtin Intermediate School are headed to the 2017 Odyssey of the Mind World Finals at Michigan State University this week. Denise A. Southard and her husband, Bret, coach the team of Williamsport youngsters that captured first place in Division I regional and state competitions with their problem, “A Superhero Cliffhanger.” “While there isn’t a direct connection to math, the students are required to build their props,” Denise said. “Their main prop is a storybook made from wood. They had to measure and cut all the wood in the construction of the book. The finished prop is a 5-foot-high book with seven ‘pages.’” The Southards started coaching OM when their daughters were in elementary school. (Their oldest daughter made it to the World Finals once, and their youngest achieved the honor twice.) Although their girls are older and no longer in OM, the couple continues to love being active in the program. “Ultimately, we both love the confidence it gives the students,” Denise said. “We have seen students, who were so shy they could barely talk to other team members, become stars on the stage! They learn how to think ‘outside the box,’ problem-solve and use power tools!” (EDITOR’S NOTE: The team finished 22nd in its division at “Worlds.”)
Photos provided

Two Alumni Honored at Penn College Spring Commencement

Pennsylvania College of Technology presented honors to two alumni during Spring 2017 commencement ceremonies, held May 12-13 at the Community Arts Center.

Thomas J. Giannattasio, of Bethesda, Maryland, received the Alumni Achievement Award on May 12, and June Kilgus Zimmerman, of Williamsport, was presented the Distinguished Alumni Award on May 13.

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Pennsylvania College of Technology is a special mission affiliate of The Pennsylvania State University