News about Industrial Design

Penn College Industrial Design Major Studies in Japan

Dwight D. Alexander

A Pennsylvania College of Technology student was one of 20 scholars worldwide to participate in a Japan-based industrial design program.

Dwight D. Alexander, of Umatilla, Florida, completed a four-day workshop at the Kobe University International Innovation Design School in Kobe, Japan. Students from the United States, Poland and Japan attended the program, which required participants to design an innovative product and evaluate how the product will enhance future society.

“It was an adventure. I wanted to go to make more connections, meet new people,” said Alexander, who is scheduled to graduate in December with an industrial design bachelor’s degree. “I can build off of what I learned there and apply it here, where we learn the techniques and technology to transform ideas into practical designs.”

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Colloquium Panel Explores Cross-Cultural Access to Medical Care

The panelists underscore their presentation with thoughtful responses to audience feedback.

Millions around the world are suffering the symptoms of serious or terminal illnesses, yet only one in 10 has access to effective pain management tools.

Three local experts teamed to explore what tools might be used to extend palliative care to areas within the United States and beyond that have few resources, presenting their findings during the latest edition of the Technology & Society Colloquia Series.

Thomas E. Ask, professor of industrial design at Pennsylvania College of Technology; Dr. John Boll, associate director of the Williamsport Family Medical Residency at UPMC Susquehanna; and Dr. Alexander Nesbitt, UPMC Susquehanna’s medical director for Susquehanna Hospice, Supportive and Palliative Care and Gatehouse Inpatient Hospice Unit, presented “Medical Care on the Edge: Redesigning Care Across Cultures” in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium on Tuesday.

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Resilient Student Achieves Goal With John Deere Position

“I just knew this was where I was supposed to be,” Hanna J. Williams says of Penn College, which attracted her through small class sizes and personal interaction with faculty and fellow students. (Photo by Tia G. La, student photographer)

Approximately 200 employers greeted the sophomore at her first Pennsylvania College of Technology career fair. As an industrial design major, the student could approach numerous companies representing all economic sectors. But her focus was the booth decked out in yellow and green, the iconic colors of John Deere.

Hanna J. Williams fell in love with John Deere tractors while growing up on her family’s 800-acre produce farm in Marion, New York. She dreamed of working at the company responsible for the equipment that made her father’s hard farm work a bit easier.

At the career fair, she planned to take the first step to making that dream a reality. She clutched her impressive resume and confidently approached the John Deere booth. Anticipation quickly turned to dejection when company representatives informed her they were recruiting only welding majors.

“They didn’t want anything to do with me,” she recalled.

Crushed, Williams walked away from the booth … but not her dream. “I had to go back,” she said. “This is what I really wanted.”

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Well-Rounded: Campus Involvement Reflects Appreciation for Life

Hanna Williams. Photo by Tia G. La

From the Fall 2017 Penn College Magazine: Student-athlete Hanna Williams’ farming childhood established her work ethic; tragedy inspired her to make the most of her student experience. Read “Well-Rounded.”

WTI Reunion Takes Grads on Round Trip Through History

Enjoying the Aviation Center surroundings are John Hertel, (left) ’48, agricultural equipment and repair, and ‘49, electric and acetylene welding, and Ralph Mills, ’58, plumbing.

The Lumley Aviation Center proved to be a popular venue for Friday’s 17th annual reunion for graduates of Williamsport Technical Institute, a Penn College predecessor from 1941-65. Alumni and their guests, totaling about 75 attendees, enjoyed swapping stories, savoring lunch and listening to remarks by President Davie Jane Gilmour. Presentations on forestry, industrial design, athletics and veterans affairs were also on the agenda. Forest technology students Nicholas J. Fedele and Nancy M. Summers shared their passions for the major, as did Erich R. Doebler, laboratory assistant for forest technology. Discussing exciting activities in industrial design were students Dwight D. Alexander, Sean P. Christy and Brett F. Warkoski, and their professor, Thomas E. Ask. Offering insights into the college’s evolving athletics efforts were John D. Vandevere, director of athletics; Lauren S. Herr, a women’s soccer student-athlete enrolled in construction management; and Chris H. Howard, head baseball coach. Chet Beaver, financial aid specialist for veterans services, detailed progress of the Penn College Patriot Scholarship and introduced student veterans on hand to assist with luncheon logistics. Following lunch, Walter V. Gower, assistant dean for transportation and natural resources technologies, took participants on a tour of the hangar, where many reveled in viewing aviation equipment and chatting with students performing various tasks on the tarmac.

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Last updated April 25, 2017 | Posted in Alumni, Aviation, Construction & Design Technologies, Construction Management, Forestry, Industrial Design, Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies, Sports, Students, Transportation & Natural Resources Technologies | This gallery contains 1 photo. | Tagged as |

College Students Help Schoolchildren ‘Tinker’ With STEM Concepts

Mentoring a pupil in Williamsport's West End

A meeting of the minds

A robot is maneuvered through a cup-lined hallway.

Creativity takes a front seat.

Students from Penn College’s Society of Inventors and Mad Scientists recently worked with Jackson Primary School kindergartners to third-graders, helping them explore the world of design and invention in the school’s “Tinker Town.” Launched in 2014 through a $1,500 mini-grant from the Williamsport Area School District Education Foundation, the after-school program provides a hands-on environment that challenges children to think creatively and critically while exploring science, technology, engineering and math. “The students did a great job of playing with the kids and helping them use their discovery toys,” said Thomas E. Ask, industrial design professor and club adviser. Taking part were industrial design majors Sean P. Christy, of Coatesville; Meghan J. Herman, of Jersey Shore; Anthony D. Sipe, of York; and Samantha M. Via, of Williamsport.
Photos by Lynne E. Piotrowski, Title I reading specialist, Williamsport Area School District

Students Perform Well in Prestigious Builders’ Competition

Members of the two- and four-year Penn College teams gather outside the International Builders’ Show in Orlando. From left are Carlos Rojas, Williamsport; Nicholas D. Gieger, Dingmans Ferry; Chad W. Hawkins, Williamsport; Robert G. Jackson III, Butler; Casey L. Grim, Red Lion; Hanna J. Williams, Marion, N.Y.; Everett B. Appleby, Wilkes-Barre; Jordan M. Scott, Cogan Station; Lindsay A. Lane, McKean; Ryan Z. Zwickle, Slatington; and Liam R. McGarvey, Cogan Station.

A pair of teams comprising students from construction-related programs at Pennsylvania College of Technology admirably met the challenge of competition at the recent National Association of Home Builders International Builders’ Show in Orlando, Florida.

A team representing associate-degree majors placed fifth in a field of 15 entrants from across the country in the Residential Construction Management Competition, and their colleagues from bachelor-degree majors finished 16th out of 35 institutions.

“The teams worked all of the fall semester on the problems given to them,” said Levon A. Whitmyer, instructor of building construction technology, noting that competition preparation is undertaken 100-percent outside of students’ class time. “The problems typically are future, real-world projects within the construction industry.”

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Foundation’s Generosity Endows Scholarship, Creates Opportunity

A significant grant from the Tamaqua-based John E. Morgan Foundation will allow students from that area to enroll in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s distinctive “degrees that work.”

The nonprofit foundation’s $500,000 contribution establishes the John E. Morgan Scholarship, which will give first preference to graduates of Tamaqua Area High School who are pursuing “a degree that is not readily available from other institutions, at a comparable price, within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.”

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Turning Castoffs Into Couture

Mahaffey (left) joins her runway entourage: Samantha M. Via, Jasmin Vega, Meghan J. Herman and Alexandra Pyda. Pyda is a nursing major; the others are enrolled in industrial design.

Thomas E. Ask, industrial design professor, and Via's mother, Rona, check out the "trashion" accessories.

A voguish Vega strikes a pose ...

... and designer and model have fun with fashion.

The “Trashion Fashion Show,” industrial design student Ashley E. Mahaffey’s senior project with a (re)purpose, was a clear crowd-pleaser in Penn College’s Thompson Professional Development Center. The Hughesville resident crafted clothing and accessories from discarded newspapers, magazines and the like, enlisting four friends to model them and eliciting considerable applause as each was unveiled. “Ashley was very happy with the results and very brave in embarking on a project like this,” said Thomas E. Ask, professor of industrial design and Mahaffey’s capstone adviser. “She had great assistance by an industry expert, Valerie Beggs, and put tons of energy, enthusiasm and intellect into the project.”
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer

 

Penn College Industrial Design Student Excels in Industry Setting

Jasmin Vega

The inquisitive, hard-working student faced a dilemma when pondering college. She possessed considerable artistic talent, yet loved to study people and the reasons behind their actions. Confronted with the career-path choice, she picked psychology over art and enrolled at a community college.

A year later, the student decided to scrap her psychology track and bridge her disparate interests by transferring to Pennsylvania College of Technology as an industrial design major.

If her performance at a recent internship is an accurate gauge, Jasmin Vega made the right decision.

Vega – a Clifton, New Jersey, native, who resides in nearby Woodland Park – excelled interning for IBC Shell Packaging in Lake Success, New York. The company designs, engineers and manufactures packaging, displays and giftware for global brands, including many in the luxury, spirits and beauty sectors.

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Penn College Student Transforms Trash to Fashion for Show

Penn College of industrial design major Ashley E. Mahaffey, of Hughesville, works on transforming trash into fashion as part of her senior capstone project. Her efforts will culminate in a free, public showcase, “Trashion Fashion Show,” on Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. in the college’s Thompson Professional Development Center.

A Pennsylvania College of Technology student’s ability to transform trash to fashion will be showcased for the public on Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. in the college’s Thompson Professional Development Center.

The “Trashion Fashion Show” is a free event devised by industrial design student Ashley E. Mahaffey, of Hughesville, as part of her senior capstone project.

“This show is intended to be evocative, to promote the upcycling lifestyle, which repurposes materials that no longer have use,” said Thomas E. Ask, professor of industrial design and Mahaffey’s capstone adviser. “Ashley is expressing design of three-dimensional forms as fashion. She has a longtime interest in fashion.”

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Penn College Students, Faculty Attend ‘Women in Technology’ Event

Female students and faculty from Penn College demonstrated their commitment to technology at the recent College to Careers: Women in Technology Conference in Harrisburg.

More than 25 female students and faculty from Pennsylvania College of Technology demonstrated their commitment to technology by attending a recent statewide event in Harrisburg.

During the College to Careers: Women in Technology Conference, the Penn College contingent experienced a panel discussion with eight women technology leaders and enjoyed networking opportunities.

“It was a very valuable experience for our students,” said Bradley M. Webb, assistant dean of the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies, who helped organize Penn College’s participation. “The students were able to not only listen to, but also interact with many impressive women in technology. The conference reinforced that gender should never be a barrier to success in technology-focused careers.”

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High School Students Celebrate STEM Day at Penn College

Penn College student Shawn L. Sheeley Jr., of Kersey, shows a high school student how to use surveying equipment. The hands-on workshop was part of a National STEM Day celebration at the college that brought homeschoolers and students from four area high schools to campus.

A group of 90 high-schoolers spent Nov. 8 at Pennsylvania College of Technology, where they explored a variety of careers as part of National STEM Day.

“STEM” is short for science, technology, engineering and math. According to the Population Reference Bureau, U.S. policymakers watch trends in the science and engineering labor force because high-tech workers increase our capacity for innovation and ability to compete in the global economy.

Penn College’s STEM Day activities were designed to give high school students a hands-on glimpse of some in-demand STEM-related careers.

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Who Designs the Future?

Graphic design student Ainsley R. Bennett adds shadow to a still-life sketch. Hand-drawing skills remain important in the college’s graphic design and advertising art majors.

In a Penn College lab, a student polishes graphics for a class project.

From the Fall 2016 Penn College Magazine: As detailed in the first episode of the “Working Class” television series, a knack for design and creativity is essential to other fields, including science, math, engineering and technology. Read “Who Designs the Future?

‘Working Class’ TV Episode Earns Telly Award

"Working Class"

The premiere episode of “Working Class,” a public television series produced by Pennsylvania College of Technology and WVIA Public Media, has earned a 2016 Telly Award.

The series was honored with a bronze award statue and certificate.

The Telly Award is acknowledged as a premier award for film and video productions, including outstanding local, regional and cable programming. The 36th annual competition this year considered more than 13,000 entries from all 50 states and five continents.

“Working Class: Dream and Do,” which premiered in January, appears regularly on WVIA. It also has aired on other Pennsylvania public television stations including WHYY and MindTV in Philadelphia, WQED in Pittsburgh, WLVT in Allentown, and WPSU in State College.

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Pennsylvania College of Technology is a special mission affiliate of The Pennsylvania State University