News about Exercise Science

Emergency Scenarios Translate to Real-Life Benefit for Students

Occupational therapy assistant student Rachel N. Zimmerman, of Pine Grove, shows physician assistant student Zachary S. Kimble, of Bellefonte (acting as a hip-replacement patient who later in the simulation would have a stroke) and other students watching how to use a “reacher” to help with dressing. Observing is Christine A. Tilburg, clinical director of physical therapist assistant.

Emergency medical services student Ian P. McClure, of Littlestown, and paramedic technician student Megan E. Bobby, of Dysart, explain the actions they would take when called to the Dental Hygiene Clinic to help a patient experiencing an allergic reaction to Novocain.

Surgical technology students simulate a laparoscopic gall bladder removal.

Around 250 students in the School of Health Sciences – an academic division that spans 11 distinct health care and allied health fields – are participating this week in a series of hands-on emergency health simulations. The school’s fourth annual Interdisciplinary Professional Event involves 24 student teams, each made up of a cross section of health disciplines, discussing and observing one another’s role in their assigned case. Students in the physician assistant major played roles of patients, whose health problems ranged from an allergic reaction to Novocain in the Dental Hygiene Clinic to a loss of consciousness in the Keystone Dining Room, and surgeries to replace hips and remove gallbladders. As “patients” moved through the health care system, they moved, with their observers, from lab to lab in the Breuder Advanced Technology & Health Sciences Center. The purpose of the experience is to prepare the students to deliberatively work together as patients interact with each of them during their health care experience, with an ultimate goal to improve patient care. Also involved were 23 staff and faculty from the school, who planned and managed the event and led groups through their simulations on Tuesday and Thursday.

Read the Spring 2017 Penn College Magazine

Spring 2017 Penn College Magazine cover

The Spring 2017 edition of Penn College Magazine features stories of service from Ecuador, where a 2009 grad is helping coastal communities to recover from a massive earthquake; Guatemala, where nursing students learned and worked in a medical clinic; Florida, where an exercise science alumna is helping clients find health; Europe, where a 1941 drafting graduate served his country and his crewmates; and our own campus, where students and employees work to support Dining Services’ free food pantry and a variety of other community needs. Look for the magazine in building lobbies, or read and share these stories now at magazine.pct.edu.

Alumna/Nutritionist Helps ‘Losers’ Make Winning Life Choices

From her childhood preference for raw onions and other vegetables, Juliette K. Yeager has always been a fan of healthy food. The 2010 graduate has put that love to work as a nutritionist for The Biggest Loser Resort at Amelia Island, Florida. Inspired by the popular TV show, the resort provides a sanctuary for individuals to explore healthy life choices, including proper nutrition. Yeager earned an associate degree in physical fitness specialist (now exercise science) at Penn College before obtaining a bachelor’s degree in nutritional sciences at Penn State in 2012, and it’s easy to see that she made the right career choice. “We had to take three nutrition classes at the time and, within the first few weeks of that first nutrition class, I knew that’s what I wanted to do,” she says. “I value the hands-on experience that I had, as opposed to just sitting in a lecture hall with hundreds of kids and not really seeing it firsthand. We actually dealt with real-life clients as opposed to just textbook learning, but I also enjoyed the fact that there was a classroom component. That education was irreplaceable for me. I use it every day, without a doubt.”

Student’s Mural Guides Cyclists Along Road to Better Health

John M. Arrigonie, lab supervisor for exercise science, and artist Lindsey Martin pause in front of the in-progress mural, which was completed between Finals Week and Winter Break.

With her own sketch to guide her, Martin adds wisps of color to a previously blank wall.

The finished mural provides a virtual destination for cycling students.

Graphic design student Lindsey Martin helped the exercise science department to transform a room formerly used to teach CPR courses. The classroom – Room 107 in Bardo Gymnasium – is now equipped for a hybrid Group Cycling and TRX Training class, taught by John M. Arrigonie, lab supervisor for exercise science. Martin has also completed murals for Schneider Electric and Whoodles, a dog grooming and training facility. In the Bardo Gym classroom, Martin’s mural is faced by cyclists on stationary bikes, so she was directed to design a scene that included a path. “I wanted it to be very vibrant,” she said, so her tree-lined path leads to a bright sunset over purple mountains.

Youth of Firetree Place Well-Served by Donation of Sports Gear

Volleyballs, tennis balls, pingpong balls and badminton equipment are among equipment donated to Firetree Place.

Exercise science students Connor J. Nettles, of Pottsville, and Daniel S. Fertig, of Turbotville, carry a pingpong table to Quinti’s pickup truck.

A cart carries a sample of the pieces as they wait to be loaded.

Nia M. Romanowicz, of Altoona, adds donated pieces that she later helped deliver to Firetree Place.

Students in Penn College’s exercise science major joined Judy Quinti, assistant professor of exercise science, in loading a delivery of sports equipment for Firetree Place, a community center just a few blocks from Penn College. The college offered equipment it no longer uses in Fitness & Lifetime Sports classes. In keeping with their career goals to promote wellness, the students delivered a pingpong table, paddles and balls; several badminton racquets with shuttlecocks; volleyballs; tennis balls; and goggles. The mission of Firetree Place is to engage youth through enrichment activities and to provide resources that will strengthen the community at large.

Ten Weeks to Fitness Victory

During a 10-week cardiovascular training program, Kay E. Dunkleberger meets fitness goals while exercise science student Hailey J. Heistand puts her classroom knowledge into practice.

Colorful equipment lines an exercise science lab in Bardo Gym.

From the Fall 2016 Penn College Magazine: Exercise science students put their knowledge into practice as they help employees meet their fitness goals. Read “Ten Weeks to Fitness Victory.”

Summer Camps Provide Practical Mix of Education, Enjoyment

Invoking the hands-on hallmark of a Penn College education

A series of academic-based camps at Pennsylvania College of Technology included enough information to satisfy minds hungry for challenge, while not forgetting that it IS summer. A wrap-up photo gallery reflects the unique career opportunities represented at Architecture Odyssey Camp, Designing a Digital Future Camp, Future Restaurateurs Career Camp, Advanced Restaurateurs Career Camp, Graphic Design Summer Studio, Health Careers Camp, SMART Girls Summer Camp, Creative Art Camp and Youth Training for Athletic Development Camp.

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Exercise Science Students Help Soccer Players Realize Training Goals

Exercise science student Christian J. Mitchell, of Marcus Hook, gives instruction to soccer player Breanna N. Cline, of Reedsville.

Faculty member Judy Quinti teaches form to two players – Colleen E. Bowes, of Wayne, and Lauren S. Herr of Lititz – who were interested in learning more about lifting free weights.

Students in exercise science are lending a hand to the Wildcat women’s soccer team as players prepare for the fall collegiate season. The students are conducting “10-rep max” testing – determining the highest weight the soccer players can lift for 10 repetitions. Using the information, Judy Quinti, assistant professor of exercise science, will develop a summer strength-training exercise program for each athlete. The idea came from an exercise science student who, for a class assignment, reviewed an article in the National Strength and Conditioning Association’s Strength and Conditioning Journal. Penn College’s exercise science major is an NSCA educationally recognized program. Because a section of the article addressed strength gains for soccer players, Quinti decided to forward it to the college’s men’s and women’s soccer coaches. Women’s soccer coach John McNichol responded, sending his players to the Bardo Gym to take advantage of the exercise science department’s expertise.

‘Cross Training’ Classes to Return in Future Semesters

Shakeem J. Thomas, an emergency management technology major from Brooklyn, N.Y., lifts weights in the Field House.

Dara M. McConnell, of Camp Hill, enrolled in dental hygiene: health policy and administration concentration, and applied management major Timothy L. Kuntz, of Wyalusing, go through their exercises.

Exercise science major/intern Jacob D. Green (right), of Houtzdale, supervises the class. Working out (from left) are Courtney M. McCartan, of West Mifflin, dental hygiene: health policy and administration concentration; Kashiki E. Harrison, Williamsport, general studies; and Thomas.

McConnell registers progress and determination.

The Penn College Fitness Center this semester introduced Cross Training, the latest addition to its Fitness & Wellness Promotion Series. The one-hour group exercise class involves small circuit-based exercises that are targeted toward burning calories while staying strong and fit. Classes accommodate participants of all fitness levels, from beginners to advanced athletes, on various techniques. The focus is on a progressive format that involves components of cardio, powerlifting and functional calisthenics. The Cross Training classes were offered on Wednesdays in the mezzanine of the Field House, and will continue in future semesters. Participation is free to all members of the Penn College community with a valid ID card. “Look for advertised postings throughout campus and at the Fitness Center (Bush Campus Center, second floor) for details about future classes,” said Domenick S. Schiraldi-Irrera, fitness center assistant (who also provided photos). “Bring a friend and we’ll see you there for another great exercise class offered here at Penn College!”

Students ‘Flip’ for Exercise Science Major

A dedicated group of exercise science students at Penn College is showcasing its flexibility, strength and creativity, thanks to an Instagram account. The students’ moves and poses, a combination of acroyoga and calisthenics, have proved to be quite popular and inspiring – as seen in this YouTube video:

Exercise Science Student Pushes Clients Toward Healthier Lives

Enrolling in the exercise science major at Penn College proved to be the right prescription for Zachary N. Austin, who sought to develop skills he could use to help people. Officially recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, the two-year major prepares graduates for a variety of rewarding careers and enhances their academic preparation for advanced degrees. “Throughout being here, I’ve learned so much hands-on experience, knowledge. Definitely gives me that experience I need to learn and know, especially when I take it into effect after college,” Austin says in a video added to the college’s YouTube channel. “What would surprise people about this major is actually all the information and everything they need to learn – with management, nutrition, kinesiology, anatomy, biology, physiology.”

Exercise Science Students to Host Public Powerlifting Competition

Students in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Exercise Science Club will host a powerlifting competition Nov. 14 at CrossFit Montoursville.

With categories for men and women, judged “pound for pound” (how much weight a person lifts per pound of body weight) the competition is open to anyone.

“It is open to the public, and because it is pound-for-pound, it is anyone’s game,” said Herndon resident Rayann J. Levan, Exercise Science Club president and a student in applied health studies: exercise science concentration at the college.

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Young Athletes Trained in Proper Technique at Monthlong Day Camp

John M. Arrigonie, exercise science faculty member, makes sure that participants are properly using the cardio equipment.

Campers are introduced to weight training with the college's Precor machines.

Upper-body stretching in the free-weight lab

Arrigonie shows participants proper leg-press technique.

Youngsters learn the correct way to bench press.

A four-week summer program for student-athletes, based on National Strength and Conditioning Association guidelines and taught by exercise science faculty from the School of Health Sciences, continues through July 15. The Youth Training for Athletic Development Camp comprises a morning session for 15- to 17-year-olds and a midday one for youngsters 12 to 14. Penn College’s exercise science major, being offered under that new name starting this fall, is the only such associate-degree program in Pennsylvania to be recognized by the NSCA.

Retired Penn College Faculty Member Granted ‘Emeritus’ Status

Paul "Babe" Mayer

Paul “Babe” Mayer, who taught in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Fitness and Lifetime Sports (now Exercise Science) Department for 25 years before his retirement in December, has been approved by the Penn College Board of Directors for “professor emeritus” status.

To be eligible for the emeritus designation, nominees must be honorably retired in good standing and have served the college for a minimum of 10 years, demonstrating a record of distinguished service to students, their department, their academic school and/or the college. Nominations are reviewed and approved by the Promotion and Sabbatical Review Committee and are recommended for board consideration by the president.

Mayer was instrumental in the development and delivery of a number of new courses within his department. He brought notoriety to the college for his training and conditioning work with athletes across the region and for his work in radio and television sports broadcasting. Prior to teaching at Penn College, Mayer taught at Williamsport Area High School, where he was instrumental in developing a personal fitness curriculum.

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Diagnosis: Future – Campers Examine Potential Health Careers

Bambi A. Hawkins, learning laboratory coordinator for the paramedic program, shows a camper proper hand placement to create a “seal” when using a bag valve mask to provide oxygen.

An important part of a fitness assessment, campers record one another’s blood pressure in the exercise science major.

A camper uses a laparoscopic camera and surgical tools in the surgical technology lab.

With assistance from a Penn College student, a camper positions radiographic equipment as she prepares to X-ray her smartphone.

A camper shows the results of her work in the dental hygiene lab: a model of her teeth.

Penn College’s School of Health Sciences was the destination for 30 high schoolers attending Health Careers Camp, a joint, two-day program of the college and Susquehanna Health. The camp offers students a chance to explore careers in the health care field. Students entering grades nine to 12 attended hands-on workshops Wednesday and Thursday in the college’s exercise science, paramedic technology, occupational therapy assistant, physician assistant, nursing, radiography, dental hygiene and surgical technology majors. To round out their experience, they toured Susquehanna Health’s Williamsport Hospital.