News: Events

Young Athletes Trained in Proper Technique at Monthlong Day Camp

John M. Arrigonie, exercise science faculty member, makes sure that participants are properly using the cardio equipment.

John M. Arrigonie, exercise science faculty member, makes sure that participants are properly using the cardio equipment.

Campers are introduced to weight training with the college's Precor machines.

Campers are introduced to weight training with the college’s Precor machines.

Upper-body stretching in the free-weight lab

Upper-body stretching in the free-weight lab

Arrigonie shows participants proper leg-press technique.

Arrigonie shows participants proper leg-press technique.

Youngsters learn the correct way to bench press.

Youngsters learn the correct way to bench press.

A four-week summer program for student-athletes, based on National Strength and Conditioning Association guidelines and taught by exercise science faculty from the School of Health Sciences, continues through July 15. The Youth Training for Athletic Development Camp comprises a morning session for 15- to 17-year-olds and a midday one for youngsters 12 to 14. Penn College’s exercise science major, being offered under that new name starting this fall, is the only such associate-degree program in Pennsylvania to be recognized by the NSCA.

Scholarship Scorecard Reflects Another Tourney Win

David Toms, framed by the gallery at his well-attended tutorial

David Toms, framed by the gallery at his well-attended tutorial

Serendipitous sunshine kisses the day's proceedings.

Serendipitous sunshine kisses the day’s proceedings.

The visiting pro takes his audience from tee ...

The visiting pro takes his audience from tee …

... to green.

… to green.

Showing his stuff within Penn's Woods, lush from recent soaking rains

Showing his stuff within Penn’s Woods, lush from recent soaking rains

David Toms, whose philanthropy runs a close second to his success on the PGA Tour, was the featured pro at Monday’s 29th annual Pennsylvania College of Technology Foundation Golf Classic at the Williamsport Country Club. Proceeds from the event, which included a morning clinic, are expected to add more than $45,000 to the Penn College Foundation Golf Classic Scholarship when all told. Prize-winners during the tournament were Ed Alberts, Tom Rudy, Matt Haile and Dan Klingerman, closest to the pin on each of four holes; Young Park, individual low net (62); Frank Covelusky, individual low gross (72, including 24 on the last six holes); Peggy Roskowski, Mike and Connie McNamara, and Park, second place in the team event (55, including 18 on the last six holes); and Phil Johnson, Covelusky, Klingerman and Richard Born (55, including 17 on the last six holes).

SMART Money’s on Problem-Solvers at Innovative Summer Camp

A participant checks progress on a 3-D printed elephant toy.

A participant checks progress on a 3-D printed elephant toy.

A member of the business Sirens of Sound explains to mentors a smartphone speaker developed by her company during the Wildcat Den Showcase.

A member of the business Sirens of Sound explains to mentors a smartphone speaker developed by her company during the Wildcat Den Showcase.

Cell phone kickstands and charms were among team Copy, Paste, Print’s products.

Cell phone kickstands and charms were among team Copy, Paste, Print’s products.

A participant shows her team’s solution to a broken camera tripod.

A participant shows her team’s solution to a broken camera tripod.

A team shows off samples of 3-D printed toys, part of its week’s work.

A team shows off samples of 3-D printed toys, part of its week’s work.

Penn College’s annual SMART Girls summer camp attracted 34 high schoolers from across Pennsylvania, some with a strong interest in science, math, engineering or technology, and others just beginning to explore those options. During the four-day camp, the girls used additive manufacturing to solve problems – like creating replacement parts for broken consumer products and designing connectors to build structures out of plastic straws. They also used their newly honed computer-aided design and 3-D printing skills to develop a product line, supported by a business plan, resume and trade-show booth. All were used to pitch “investors,” the camp’s mentors, during the “Wildcat Den Showcase,” a SMART Girls take on television’s “Shark Tank.” SMART Girls – Science and Math Applications in Real-World Technologies for Girls – was implemented by Penn College to reverse the trend of girls to shy away from math and science courses and the rewarding, family-sustaining careers that use those skills. The camp, which also included career interest assessments and company tours, was facilitated by the college’s Outreach for K-12 Office. Mentors were Eric K. Albert, associate professor of machine tool technology/automated manufacturing at Penn College; Tom Gill, a science teacher at Central Columbia High School; Christina L. Herman, director of student services and career development for Loyalsock Township School District; and Alice S. Justice, school counselor at Central Columbia Middle School. Camp director was Tanya Berfield, project and data reporting technician in Outreach for K-12.

College Co-Hosts Recruitment Event for Potential CDL Students

Pamela Mix, secretary to the ESC executive director and assistant dean of transportation and natural resources technologies, takes the wheel of the simulator.

Pamela Mix, secretary to the ESC executive director and assistant dean of transportation and natural resources technologies, takes the wheel of the simulator.

Friendly greeters (from left) are Jim Patterson, CTS director; Carla Rhone, program support specialist, Shale TEC; and Hadly Ransom, intensive workforce specialist, PA CareerLink Lycoming County.

Friendly greeters (from left) are Jim Patterson, CTS director; Carla Rhone, program support specialist, Shale TEC; and Hadly Ransom, intensive workforce specialist, PA CareerLink Lycoming County.

CTS' simulator, inside a trailer parked outside, awaits Open House attendees.

CTS’ simulator, inside a trailer parked outside, awaits Open House attendees.

Kevin Cromley and Kathy Pentz, local CTS instructors for Penn College CDL classes

Kevin Cromley and Kathy Pentz, local CTS instructors for Penn College CDL classes

A CDL Open House, held Thursday to attract students into Penn College’s Commercial Driver’s License program, was co-hosted at the Schneebeli Earth Science Center by Workforce Development & Continuing Education and the Center for Transportation Safety. CTS brought a simulated rig to the event so that potential students could experience driving a tractor-trailer; a skid steer was also on hand to let participants practice vehicle control. WDCE, which contracts with CTS to provide CDL Class A training at the college’s Energy Technology Education Center site along Route 15 near Allenwood, hopes to add Class B and CDL Refresher Safe Driving courses to its portfolio.
Photos by Pamela Mix and Hadly Ransom

Orientation Helps Hundreds Form Penn College Attachment

Employees and students staff check-in tables in Dauphin Hall's Capitol Eatery.

Employees and students staff check-in tables in Dauphin Hall’s Capitol Eatery.

Emma J. Sutterlin, an applied health studies: occupational therapy assistant concentration major from State College, is among Connections' invaluable student Links.

Emma J. Sutterlin, an applied health studies: occupational therapy assistant concentration major from State College, is among Connections’ invaluable student Links.

Encouraging incoming students and their families to “share their memories,” Paul R. Watson II, dean of academic services and first year programs, takes a selfie in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium with a Penn College pennant and an Albert Einstein bobblehead.

Encouraging incoming students and their families to “share their memories,” Paul R. Watson II, dean of academic services and first year programs, takes a selfie in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium with a Penn College pennant and an Albert Einstein bobblehead.

Connections Links, students ready to assist incoming freshmen, introduce themselves …

Connections Links, students ready to assist incoming freshmen, introduce themselves …

… and musically welcome families to the summer’s first orientation session.

… and musically welcome families to the summer’s first orientation session.

More than 360 new students and their guests are attending Penn College’s first Connections orientation program for the Fall 2015 semester, which began Wednesday morning on main campus. The first of six two-day summer sessions, in which employees and student assistants (called Links) break the ice, shatter misconceptions and bust a few dance moves in apprising first-year enrollees to the full Penn College experience. Two one-day sessions will also be offered for adult learners and transfer students.

Junior Chefs Conquer Kitchen as ‘Future Restaurateurs Camp’ Debuts

Campers prepare daikon radishes for a salad garnish.

Campers prepare daikon radishes for a salad garnish.

Chef Frank M. Suchwala, assistant professor of hospitality management/culinary arts, helps a student learn knife skills as she minces parsley.

Chef Frank M. Suchwala, assistant professor of hospitality management/culinary arts, helps a student learn knife skills as she minces parsley.

The students’ final buffet (just a portion is shown here) shows off their hard work.

The students’ final buffet (just a portion is shown here) shows off their hard work.

– A student dices carrots using safe cutting procedures.

– A student dices carrots using safe cutting procedures.

Chef Craig A. Cian, associate professor of hospitality management/culinary arts, shows a student how to shave a tomato to create a rose-shaped garnish.

Chef Craig A. Cian, associate professor of hospitality management/culinary arts, shows a student how to shave a tomato to create a rose-shaped garnish.

A new addition to Penn College’s hands-on summer lineup, this week’s Future Restaurateurs Career Camp gave high school students a two-day taste of the restaurant life. Students entering grades nine to 12 learned such important kitchen basics as knife skills and safety, as well as menu planning and dining room etiquette, as they spent their time planning and preparing a buffet lunch that culminated the camp. Among their finished products were fruit and vegetable carvings, salad and dressing, ice cream, sorbet and a variety of sauces to top them, crème brulee, guacamole, and more.

Diagnosis: Future – Campers Examine Potential Health Careers

Bambi A. Hawkins, learning laboratory coordinator for the paramedic program, shows a camper proper hand placement to create a “seal” when using a bag valve mask to provide oxygen.

Bambi A. Hawkins, learning laboratory coordinator for the paramedic program, shows a camper proper hand placement to create a “seal” when using a bag valve mask to provide oxygen.

An important part of a fitness assessment, campers record one another’s blood pressure in the exercise science major.

An important part of a fitness assessment, campers record one another’s blood pressure in the exercise science major.

A camper uses a laparoscopic camera and surgical tools in the surgical technology lab.

A camper uses a laparoscopic camera and surgical tools in the surgical technology lab.

With assistance from a Penn College student, a camper positions radiographic equipment as she prepares to X-ray her smartphone.

With assistance from a Penn College student, a camper positions radiographic equipment as she prepares to X-ray her smartphone.

A camper shows the results of her work in the dental hygiene lab: a model of her teeth.

A camper shows the results of her work in the dental hygiene lab: a model of her teeth.

Penn College’s School of Health Sciences was the destination for 30 high schoolers attending Health Careers Camp, a joint, two-day program of the college and Susquehanna Health. The camp offers students a chance to explore careers in the health care field. Students entering grades nine to 12 attended hands-on workshops Wednesday and Thursday in the college’s exercise science, paramedic technology, occupational therapy assistant, physician assistant, nursing, radiography, dental hygiene and surgical technology majors. To round out their experience, they toured Susquehanna Health’s Williamsport Hospital.

Imagination, Real-World Possibilities Merge at Digital Future Camp

Matthew A. Bamonte (right) who graduated last month with a bachelor's degree in information technology sciences-gaming and simulation, assists a young camper with his question.

Matthew A. Bamonte (right) who graduated last month with a bachelor’s degree in information technology sciences-gaming and simulation, assists a young camper with his question.

Young campers learn how to program simulation on a Lego robot.

Young campers learn how to program simulation on a Lego robot.

Apps are where it's at! A group of campers learns how to develop mobile applications under the tutelage of Spyke M. Krepshaw, instructor of computer information technology.

Apps are where it’s at! A group of campers learns how to develop mobile applications under the tutelage of Spyke M. Krepshaw, instructor of computer information technology.

A study in concentration

A study in concentration

Campers and their mentors pause for a group shot in front of the ATHS after lunch on their final day.

Campers and their mentors pause for a group shot in front of the ATHS after lunch on their final day.

Forty high school students from across Pennsylvania explored potential careers in Penn College’s fourth annual “Designing a Digital Future Camp” on Tuesday and Wednesday. The campers, entering 10th, 11th or 12th grade this fall, embraced the boundless employment possibilities of gaming, Web design, product design, mobile applications and graphic design during hands-on workshops in the Breuder Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center and the Bush Campus Center. The popular camp, one of a number offered on campus this summer, is a collaboration of the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies and the School of Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications.

Community Flag March Offers Renewed Tribute to ‘Old Glory’
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Among the night's award-winners was Betsy Ross, portrayed by Donna Pepperman, of Loyalsock Township. The float, organized with Galen W. Seaman Sr. and the Korean War Veterans of Lycoming County, played patriotic music from loudspeakers as it passed through campus.

Despite an abbreviated program and attendance thinned by rain, Williamsport’s 32nd annual God, Country and Community Flag March was held as planned Sunday night. The parade formed several blocks away at Nichols Place, eventually traveling onto the Penn College campus and ending under the 30-by-60-foot American flag outside the Student & Administrative Services Center. There, a 15-minute ceremony – including the National Anthem; a cross-country recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance; and acknowledgment of Scout troops, veterans organizations and other patriots – celebrated the 238th birthday of America’s high-flying, ever-waving symbol.

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Recent High School Graduate’s Artwork Featured in Gallery Lobby

Danny Smith, a 2015 graduate of Williamsport Area High School, stands in the lobby of The Gallery at Penn College where his artwork is on display through June 26. Smith received an Artistic Excellence Award from the gallery.

Fine art by Danny Smith, a 2015 graduate of Williamsport Area High School, is on display in the lobby of The Gallery at Penn College through June 26.

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House Appropriations Committee Convenes in Madigan Library

With Everett to her right, Strickland addresses the group – which includes Markosek (left foreground) and Adolph.

With Everett to her right, Strickland addresses the group – which includes Markosek (left foreground) and Adolph.

Strickland and Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour listen to testimony from Kurt Hausammann, Jr. (left-center background), Lycoming County's director of planning.

Strickland and Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour listen to testimony from Kurt Hausammann, Jr. (left-center background), Lycoming County’s director of planning.

Penn College hosted a roundtable meeting of the state House Appropriations Committee on Thursday, providing a forum for local business leaders to informally talk about Gov. Tom Wolf’s proposed budget proposal, workforce development, Marcellus Shale and other topics of mutual interest. Welcoming the group to campus, Carolyn R. Strickland, vice president for enrollment management and associate provost, shared the need for more support on the per-student appropriation from Harrisburg. She backed up that request by citing the institution’s positive impact on Pennsylvania’s economy, sending a consistently high rate of broadly skilled graduates into the commonwealth’s employment ranks with “degrees that work” in more than 100 career fields. The legislative contingent, which included the respective chairs from both parties – William F. Adolph Jr., R-Springfield, and Rep. Joseph F. Markosek, D-Monroeville – held its afternoon session on the second floor of Madigan Library after a public hearing at Williamsport Regional Medical Center. The visit was facilitated by Rep. Garth D. Everett, R-Muncy, a member of the college’s board of directors, who was joined by Lycoming County colleague Rep. Jeff C. Wheeland, R-Williamsport. As the group adjourned with gratitude for the college’s hospitality, Markosek said he was pleased to visit a facility that pays tribute to Roger A. Madigan, a former member of both the state House and Senate. Markosek, for whom a library is named in Allegheny County’s Plum Borough, said he and Madigan once joked that such an honor is the true measure of a legislator’s success.

Barbour to Visit With Area Nittany Lion Club on June 24

Sandy Barbour

Penn State Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour is scheduled to speak at the Williamsport Area Nittany Lion Booster Club’s monthly meeting, set for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 24, at The Genetti Hotel in Williamsport.

Nearing 10 months directing Penn State’s 31-sport program, Barbour will speak about her first year in Happy Valley, her vision and plans for the future, and answer questions at the meeting, which is free and open to the public.

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Thermoforming Center of Excellence Again Hosts National Audience

Christopher J. Gagliano (in front of equipment), program manager for the PIRC’s Thermoforming Center of Excellence at Penn College, leads a lab tour during a May workshop for industry professionals.

Plastics employees from five states were schooled by industry experts and campus professionals when the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center at Pennsylvania College of Technology held its sixth annual Heavy-Gauge/Cut-Sheet Thermoforming workshop in May.

The three-day course offered enlightening classroom presentations from several industry luminaries, as well as numerous hands-on sessions that covered operation and troubleshooting of thermoforming equipment, materials testing and introduction to new mold-making materials.

“Year after year, it is good to see that many companies across the country continue to invest in their employees and see the value in attending our workshops,” said Christopher J. Gagliano, program manager, Thermoforming Center of Excellence.

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Noble Works Express Devotion to Humanity

The artist, who says he's not interested in "pretty pictures" but in art that tells a story about humanity and how we should live, explains his creative process …

The artist, who says he’s not interested in “pretty pictures” but in art that tells a story about humanity and how we should live, explains his creative process …

… to an attentive audience that was also treated to Smith's recitation of Tennyson's "Ulysses," the source of the exhibit's title.

… to an attentive audience that was also treated to Smith’s recitation of Tennyson’s “Ulysses,” the source of the exhibit’s title.

The gallery's exhibition title wall welcomes visitors and offers poetic insight into the artist's intentions.

The gallery’s exhibition title wall welcomes visitors and offers poetic insight into the artist’s intentions.

Bronze sculptures depicting beggars in Venice, Italy, tell stories of history and humanity.

Bronze sculptures depicting beggars in Venice, Italy, tell stories of history and humanity.

The beauty of the gallery space is enhanced by the artistic offerings, light and shadows.

The beauty of the gallery space is enhanced by the artistic offerings, light and shadows.

“Though much is taken, much abides …,” an exhibit of bronze sculptures and drawings by Ed Smith, a professor of art at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York, opened Thursday in The Gallery at Penn College. Drawing on inspiration he uncovered on biennial art adventures in Venice, Italy, Smith devotes his “Beggars of Venice” series to illuminating the lives of the city’s most impoverished residents who he likens to mythic gods. Just as bronze figures have historically acknowledged great men or deeds, his figures strive to offer a glimpse into what is often overlooked, yet still noble. During the opening, Smith, a Guggenheim Fellow in sculpture and drawing and an associate member of the Royal British Society of Sculptors, read the renowned poem, “Ulysses,” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson – the source of his exhibit’s title. He also mentioned how impressed he was with the college’s embrace of humanism’s concepts, which include a belief in people’s potential and an emphasis on rational problem-solving. Gallery patrons can view Smith’s work through June 26; summer hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays and 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays (closed Saturdays and Mondays).

Plastics Professionals Converge on Penn College Campus

Aided by student Madison T. Powell (left), a part-time Plastics Innovation & Resource Center research assistant, Gary E. McQuay (right), PIRC engineering manager, preps attentive participants for the hands-on portion of the workshop.

The renowned Plastics Innovation & Resource Center at Pennsylvania College of Technology extended its expertise to plastics professionals throughout the country by hosting the seventh annual Hands-On Rotational Molding & Advanced Materials Workshop earlier this month.

With support from the Association of Rotational Molders and the Society of Plastics Engineers Rotational Molding Division, the PIRC’s workshop brought 31 individuals to campus, representing various sectors of the plastics industry and 11 states.

“It was tremendous to host diverse plastics professionals from throughout the country for this year’s workshop,” said Gary E. McQuay, PIRC engineering manager. “Attracting such talent on an annual basis speaks to the high quality of both the workshop and our plastics facilities at Penn College.”

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