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Board Approves Budget, Tuition; Gifts to City, School District


Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Board of Directors on Thursday approved the college’s budget and tuition for 2014-15, as well as gifts to the City of Williamsport and Williamsport Area School District.

The board also re-elected its slate of officers and approved appointments to the Community Arts Center Board of Directors.

The college’s operating budget will be $107.6 million in 2014-15, an increase of 3.07 percent. Tuition will increase by 3.85 percent. Combining tuition and fees, the increases for 2014-15 are 3.41 percent for Pennsylvania residents and 3.54 percent for out-of-state students.

A full-time, in-state student enrolled for the typical two 15-credit semesters in 2014-15 will pay $15,450 in tuition and fees, an increase of $510 over 2013-14. A full-time out-of-state student enrolled for two 15-credit semesters will pay a total of $21,930 in tuition and fees, an increase of $750 over 2013-14. Residence Life rates are rising by 2 percent; Dining Services’ rates will rise by an average of 1.5 percent.

President Davie Jane Gilmour and Vice President for Finance/CFO Suzanne T. Stopper both told the board the guiding principle in the budgeting process this year, as it is every year, is the amount that students must pay to attend Penn College.

“There’s no question, there had to be give and take,” Gilmour said.

Board summary
Board of Directors meeting recapped for campus community

The board authorized gifts of $100,000 to the City of Williamsport and $35,000 to the Williamsport Area School District. Both voluntary contributions are re-evaluated annually.

All of the board’s officers were re-elected for 2014-15. They are Sen. Gene Yaw, chair; John J. Cahir, vice chair; and Joseph J. Doncsecz, treasurer.

The board approved the appointments of Gilmour, William J. Martin, Stopper, Veronica M. Muzic and Barry R. Stiger to the Community Arts Center Board. Alternates are Robert G. Bowers, Paul L. Starkey and Ann Marie Phillips.

Clifford P. Coppersmith, dean of the School of Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications, presented to the board on activities within the school. He spoke of the transitioning leadership team and informed the board about the ongoing project to provide a new look to the exterior of the donated Boeing 727 aircraft owned by the college, which is used for instructional purposes in aviation programs.

The design came from 2013 graphic design alumnus Kyle R. Taylor for an illustration class taught by Brian A. Flynn, assistant professor of graphic design. Students continue to work on the ambitious project under the oversight of Kevin P. Sullivan, lab coordinator for programs in the school. Coppersmith said the project is expected to be completed by the end of summer.

Coppersmith also spoke to the board about the Centennial Mosaic project nearing completion on a wall at the Physician Assistant Center on campus. That project is being coordinated by David A. Stabley, instructor of ceramics/wood sculpture.

In her comments to the board, Gilmour noted Penn College’s bond rating has been upgraded by Standard & Poor’s, and its “A” long-term rating affirmed.

She also mentioned the recent death of William D. Davis Sr., a member of the original Penn College Board of Directors (after the affiliation with Penn State), as well as the Penn College Foundation Board.

“He’ll leave a lasting legacy in our community, for certain,” she said.

The August Board of Directors meeting has been canceled. The board will next meet on Oct. 9.

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