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All-in-one game changer added to CAL’s machining lineup

Allison Crane & Rigging brought a fleet of heavy-duty equipment to facilitate offloading of the equipment ...
Allison Crane & Rigging brought a fleet of heavy-duty equipment to facilitate offloading of the equipment …
... and its forklift delivery to the laboratory floor.
… and its forklift delivery to the laboratory floor.
Students inspect the newly arrived Haas equipment in the automated manufacturing lab.
Students inspect the newly arrived Haas equipment in the automated manufacturing lab.
The center features a side-mounted tool changer.
The center features a side-mounted tool changer.
The equipment awaits final hookup, faculty training – and students in the CIM228 course starting this fall.
The equipment awaits final hookup, faculty training – and students in the CIM228 course starting this fall.

A Haas 5-axis Universal Machining Center (Model 500), poised to take Penn College’s machining curriculum to a new level, was delivered to College Avenue Labs on Tuesday morning. Purchased at an educational discount through a partnership with Phillips Corp. in Bensalem, the equipment adds the versatility of a rotational axis that allows for easier shaping of harder-to-machine parts – picture a jet engine turbine blade, for instance. The equipment will be the focus of the new course, Advanced CNC Multi-Axis Programming and Machining, in which students will be able to insert a piece of metal and produce a finished product with specialized and complicated machining details. Such equipment in industry reduces setup time and increases accuracy for multisided and complex parts, said Richard K. Hendricks Jr., instructor of machine tool technology/automated manufacturing, and greatly boosts students’ marketability. “For students to learn on this technology, it will further enhance their ability to be productive and effective employees the moment they enter the manufacturing floor for their internship or full-time career,” he said. “We can’t thank Phillips Corp. enough for their partnership to help make this possible.”

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