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Agreements Provide Continuing-Ed Pathway for Delaware Tech Grads

Students earning associate degrees in several majors at Delaware Technical Community College will benefit from recently signed agreements that provide an avenue to a bachelor’s degree from Pennsylvania College of Technology.

The agreements provide students from four Delaware Tech majors with a streamlined transition to junior-level standing in bachelor-degree majors, without duplicating courses.

“We are excited about these transfer agreements with Penn College,” said Brent Mitchell, department chair and program adviser at Delaware Tech. “This partnership provides our graduates with more opportunities to pursue a bachelor’s degree in fields that are in-demand.”

From left, Carol A. Lugg, assistant dean of construction and design technologies at Penn College; Kathern R. Friel, acting dean of instruction at Delaware Technical Community College; and Stacey C. Hampton, assistant dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies at Penn College, attend Delaware Tech’s Engineering Technology Fair to inform students of an agreement establishing a path for Delaware Tech graduates to pursue bachelor’s degrees at Penn College.
From left, Carol A. Lugg, assistant dean of construction and design technologies at Penn College; Kathern R. Friel, acting dean of instruction at Delaware Technical Community College; and Stacey C. Hampton, assistant dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies at Penn College, attend Delaware Tech’s Engineering Technology Fair to inform students of an agreement establishing a path for Delaware Tech graduates to pursue bachelor’s degrees at Penn College.

Students graduating from Delaware Tech in electromechanical maintenance engineering technology will have the opportunity to pursue a bachelor’s degree in building automation technology at Penn College. Those graduating from Delaware Tech’s energy technologies: building automation systems major may matriculate into Penn College’s bachelor’s degree in applied technology studies.

“We look forward to offering a four-year degree path for the students from Delaware Tech into our building automation courses,” said Todd S. Woodling, assistant professor of building automation technologies. “It was a pleasure to work with the faculty at Delaware Tech, and I believe we established strong pathways for both the energy management and the electromechanical degrees. Students considering this transfer pathway should know that our graduates are in-demand and highly employable.”

In addition, Delaware Tech’s automotive technology graduates may transfer to Penn College’s bachelor’s degree in automotive technology management. Graduates of Delaware Tech’s design engineering technology (mechanical) major may pursue a bachelor’s degree in engineering design technology at Penn College.

“It was a wonderful experience to collaborate with Delaware Technical Community College faculty in the formation of this articulation, and I am pleased a pathway has been created for their students to advance their studies in engineering design technology at Penn College,” said Katherine A. Walker, assistant professor of drafting and computer aided design at Penn College.

Recently, two assistant deans from Penn College attended Delaware Tech’s Engineering Technology Fair.

“Employers attending the fair were pleased to hear of the work being accomplished between our institutions,” said Carol A. Lugg, assistant dean of construction and design technologies at Penn College. “By connecting the associate degree to a bachelor’s degree, the student is provided an entryway into an opportunity for increased wages and employment options in highly technical fields.”

For information about Penn College, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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