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Administrators boost support for diversity, student leadership


Two senior-level administrators at Pennsylvania College of Technology are amplifying their financial support for efforts to enhance diversity and to further develop student leadership opportunities at the institution.

Carolyn R. Strickland, vice president for enrollment management and associate provost, and Elliott Strickland, vice president for student affairs, have a two-decade history of philanthropy that has empowered student success at Penn College. As advocates for student development through leadership, service, scholarship and global experiences, they appreciate the precise balance of learning opportunities that Penn College provides inside and outside its renowned classrooms and labs.

At a Pennsylvania College of Technology commencement ceremony, Elliot Strickland (left) and Carolyn R. Strickland, flank student speaker Hashim Abbas Alfulful. The Stricklands are boosting support for their efforts to enhance diversity and further develop student leadership opportunities at the institution.
At a Pennsylvania College of Technology commencement ceremony, Elliot Strickland (left) and Carolyn R. Strickland, flank student speaker Hashim Abbas Alfulful. The Stricklands are boosting support for their efforts to enhance diversity and further develop student leadership opportunities at the institution.

This year, the Stricklands are increasing their commitment to the Start to Finish Minority Student Scholarship, which will empower more students from diverse backgrounds to pursue an applied technology education and achieve their dreams.

The Stricklands, who are Coach’s Level Wildcat Club members, have also made a commitment to Penn College Athletics, allowing the college to establish a leadership development program for student-athletes. “WE LEAD” (Wildcats Empowered to Learn, Engage and Discover) will develop student-athletes who aspire to be leaders, influencing culture in their programs, teams, departments and the overall campus community in a positive and meaningful way. Through programming, seminars and workshops, WE LEAD will strive to instill values centered on transformational leadership theory through authentic and servant-leadership models.

As ongoing champions of the Student Government Association, the Stricklands have also made a gift to support the Student Leader Legacy Scholarship fund, since the annual auction to raise money for this important scholarship was unable to take place this year.

“Penn College is an incredibly special place, both for us and for our community,” the Stricklands said. “We are proud to be able to give back to our students in ways that we believe will assist them in growing and developing into our future leaders.”

As administrators, the Stricklands promote a student-centered environment and community of respect – one that celebrates diversity, fosters a holistic experience and influences lifelong learning. These shared values are expressed through their philanthropic passions. Some previous examples of their support are: the Global Learning Fund, the Strickland Family Scholarship for Outstanding Leadership and Service and a Wildcat Mascot gift.

“Students are always top-of-mind when the Stricklands consider their philanthropic influence,” said Loni N. Kline, vice president for institutional advancement. “Their thoughtful giving provides students with opportunities to thrive during their collegiate experiences and well beyond.”

Anyone interested in contributing to the Penn College experience may contact the Penn College Foundation, One College Avenue, Williamsport, PA 17701; give online or call 570-320-8020.

Penn College is a national leader in applied technology education. For more, email the Admissions Office or call toll-free 800-367-9222.

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