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A dazzling display of floral imagination

Doubly masked – half in costume and half in conscientious compliance – Evan R. Amatore exhibits his arrangement. He is a culinary arts and systems student from Easton.
Doubly masked – half in costume and half in conscientious compliance – Evan R. Amatore exhibits his arrangement. He is a culinary arts and systems student from Easton.
A celebration of inventiveness! From left are Ruhl; John F. Montague, of Newtown, Conn., applied management; Daniel L. Jackson, of Phoenixville, landscape/horticulture technology: landscape emphasis; Trevor M. Rosato, of Jersey Shore, culinary arts and systems; Amatore; and Cinnamon A. Digan, of Mifflinburg, welding and fabrication engineering technology.
A celebration of inventiveness! From left are Ruhl; John F. Montague, of Newtown, Conn., applied management; Daniel L. Jackson, of Phoenixville, landscape/horticulture technology: landscape emphasis; Trevor M. Rosato, of Jersey Shore, culinary arts and systems; Amatore; and Cinnamon A. Digan, of Mifflinburg, welding and fabrication engineering technology.
With her creation deservedly on the pedestal, Digan strikes a pose.
With her creation deservedly on the pedestal, Digan strikes a pose.

Karen R. Ruhl’s Art of Floral Design class continues to generate impressive results, the latest of which were displayed Thursday at the Schneebeli Earth Science Center. “The students used their mysterious creativity to produce some uncanny seasonal masterpieces,” said a Halloween-inspired Marci M. Hessert, office assistant to the assistant dean of diesel technology and natural resources. “Karen is a talented and energetic instructor who is able to ‘terrify’ the students into producing spine-chilling and hair-raising works of art.” The course (HRT260 on the registrar’s master schedule for Spring 2022) is available to students from any academic major who are looking to fulfill an art elective.
Photos provided by Hessert

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