Mosaic Exhibit Fills Gallery With ‘Wow,’ Wonderment

  • Last updated July 13, 2012
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Terra Incognita,” featuring the astounding contributions of five mosaic artists prospecting through heretofore unknown lands, has officially begun its six-week run at The Gallery at Penn College. A “Meet the Artist” reception and gallery talk were held Thursday on the third floor of Madigan Library, amplifying the public chorus of amazement that has greeted the exhibit since its July 10 opening. The works of JeanAnn Dabb, Karen Kettering Dimit, Cynthia Fisher, Yulia Hanansen and Rachel Sager Lynch will be on display through Aug. 26 at the gallery, which also hosted a two-day, hands-on workshop with Hanansen. All exhibits are free and open to the public. Through July 31, the gallery is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 1-4 p.m. Sunday. Beginning Aug. 1, the gallery will operate on its regular schedule: 1-4 p.m. Sunday, 2-7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday and Friday (closed Monday and Saturday.)

— Photos by Cindy D. Meixel, writer/photo editor

Display cabinets in the foyer showcase mosaic-making tools and materials.

Display cabinets in the foyer showcase mosaic-making tools and materials.

Creative exploration: Dabb's "Imaginary Archaeology" digs deep

Creative exploration: Dabb’s “Imaginary Archaeology” digs deep

A chickadee takes flight.

A chickadee takes flight.

Tools of the trade: glass cutters

Tools of the trade: glass cutters

Hanansen assists a student.

Hanansen assists a student.

A mosaic mirror on display in the room reflects inspiration.

A mosaic mirror on display in the room reflects inspiration.

An art room in the Bush Campus Center was the setting for a two-day workshop, instructed by Hanansen and a popular part of the exhibit's opening.

An art room in the Bush Campus Center was the setting for a two-day workshop, instructed by Hanansen and a popular part of the exhibit’s opening.

A close-up of Karen Kettering Dimit's "Miss Cucuteni" goddess statue

A close-up of Karen Kettering Dimit’s “Miss Cucuteni” goddess statue

Gallery Director Lenore G. Penfield joins in the fun offered by the unique "Spyglass" view.

Gallery Director Lenore G. Penfield joins in the fun offered by the unique “Spyglass” view.

Sager has fun photographing "Spyglass" with her cell phone, while fellow artist Hanansen looks on.

Sager has fun photographing “Spyglass” with her cell phone, while fellow artist Hanansen looks on.

Mosaic goddesses pose following the successful exhibit. From left are Hanansen, Dimit, Lynch and Dabb.

Mosaic goddesses pose following the successful exhibit. From left are Hanansen, Dimit, Lynch and Dabb.

Dabb (foreground) discusses her work, "Howard's Beach," with fellow artist Hanansen.

Dabb (foreground) discusses her work, “Howard’s Beach,” with fellow artist Hanansen.

Visitors mingle and maneuver around myriad marvelous mosaics.

Visitors mingle and maneuver around myriad marvelous mosaics.

"Howard's Beach" features geological pieces gathered in the North Dakota Badlands.

“Howard’s Beach” features geological pieces gathered in the North Dakota Badlands.

A closer look at Dimit's "New York City Water Towers VIII"

A closer look at Dimit’s “New York City Water Towers VIII”

Another view through Sager's "Spyglass" reveals her "Here Be Dragons" work beyond the circle.

Another view through Sager’s “Spyglass” reveals her “Here Be Dragons” work beyond the circle.

Explorations in mosaic artistry: Sager's spinning "Spyglass" offers viewers alternate views of the works, including her "Terra Incognita" series in the background.

Explorations in mosaic artistry: Sager’s spinning “Spyglass” offers viewers alternate views of the works, including her “Terra Incognita” series in the background.

The gallery crowd listens.

The gallery crowd listens.

Penny G. Lutz, gallery assistant (center), introduces four of the artists: from left, Yulia Hanansen, Rachel Sager Lynch, Karen Kettering Dimit, and JeanAnn Dabb prior to the artists' talk. (Cynthia Fisher was unable to attend.)

Penny G. Lutz, gallery assistant (center), introduces four of the artists: from left, Yulia Hanansen, Rachel Sager Lynch, Karen Kettering Dimit, and JeanAnn Dabb prior to the artists’ talk. (Cynthia Fisher was unable to attend.)

Guests inspect Dimit's "Miss Kali," part of her "Subway Goddess Pageant" series. This modern-day Kali carries a cell phone, coffee cup, blow dryer and purse.

Guests inspect Dimit’s “Miss Kali,” part of her “Subway Goddess Pageant” series. This modern-day Kali carries a cell phone, coffee cup, blow dryer and purse.

Hanansen's "Jupiter: Great Red Spot" takes viewers beyond one-dimensional images, evoking awe with flow of matter and motion. The work won "Best of Show" in the 2011 Mosaic Arts International competition.

Hanansen’s “Jupiter: Great Red Spot” takes viewers beyond one-dimensional images, evoking awe with flow of matter and motion. The work won “Best of Show” in the 2011 Mosaic Arts International competition.

Dimit discusses her goddess pieces with a gallery guest.

Dimit discusses her goddess pieces with a gallery guest.

A gallery patron takes in Dabb's "Core: Tintac District" (three pieces on the wall), with her work, "Assay I: Delamar" in the foreground.

A gallery patron takes in Dabb’s “Core: Tintac District” (three pieces on the wall), with her work, “Assay I: Delamar” in the foreground.

A detailed shot of Dimit's "Miss Cyclades," with "Miss Bird Lady" in the background

A detailed shot of Dimit’s “Miss Cyclades,” with “Miss Bird Lady” in the background

Hanansen's intricately layered glass artistry and appreciation of astronomy are evident in this detail of "Zirconium Giant: Green Star System."

Hanansen’s intricately layered glass artistry and appreciation of astronomy are evident in this detail of “Zirconium Giant: Green Star System.”

A detail of Cynthia Fisher's "Vladimir's Circle"

A detail of Cynthia Fisher’s “Vladimir’s Circle”

... and featuring Marcellus shale harvested from the artist's farm in southwestern Pennsylvania

… and featuring Marcellus shale harvested from the artist’s farm in southwestern Pennsylvania

Gazing deeper into a Fisher creation

Gazing deeper into a Fisher creation

Another close-up ... this one from Dimit's "Goddess" series

Another close-up … this one from Dimit’s “Goddess” series

Sager's love of cartography is obvious in her "Here Be Dragons" piece.

Sager’s love of cartography is obvious in her “Here Be Dragons” piece.

"The Mighty Marcellus Series II," a work by Lynch exploring Pennsylvania's fascinating geology and the natural gas industry ...

“The Mighty Marcellus Series II,” a work by Lynch exploring Pennsylvania’s fascinating geology and the natural gas industry …

Sager's "A World Divided," part of her "Geology Series," celebrates our native land, stone by stone, with Pennsylvania sandstone as her anchoring medium.

Sager’s “A World Divided,” part of her “Geology Series,” celebrates our native land, stone by stone, with Pennsylvania sandstone as her anchoring medium.

Fisher's "To Everything There is a Season, Summer" (foreground) mimics the beauty outside The Gallery's large, signature window.

Fisher’s “To Everything There is a Season, Summer” (foreground) mimics the beauty outside The Gallery’s large, signature window.

"Terra Incognita," mosaic explorations by five artists from five states

“Terra Incognita,” mosaic explorations by five artists from five states