News: Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications

Human Services Faculty Members Present at Conference

Two human services faculty members at Pennsylvania College of Technology recently presented student-advising ideas at the 37th  annual National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology, held at St. Pete Beach, Florida.

Deb Q. Bechtel, instructor of human services/social science, and Susan Slamka, assistant professor of human services/psychology, presented “It Takes a Village: Suggestions for Advising Students at the Program Level” during one of the conference’s poster presentation sessions.

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College’s Centennial Colloquia Culminate in Panel Discussion

Moderator James E. Cunningham, retired vice president for information technology and business process improvement, notes that campus lectures will continue as the Dan Doyle Science, Technology and Society Colloquia Series. Doyle, faculty emeritus and the college's Master Teacher in 1984, was a driving force behind the college's just-ended Centennial celebration.

Moderator James E. Cunningham, retired vice president for information technology and business process improvement, notes that campus lectures will continue as the Dan Doyle Science, Technology and Society Colloquia Series. Doyle, faculty emeritus and the college’s Master Teacher in 1984, was a driving force behind the college’s just-ended Centennial celebration.

Faculty panelists drawn from this past year's Centennial Colloquia Series field a question from the audience. From left are Dorothy J. Gerring and Robert A. Wozniak, associate professors of architectural technology; Lisa R. Bock, assistant professor of computer information technology; Mark D. Noe, professor of English-composition; Rob Cooley, assistant professor of anthropology/environmental science; and Craig A. Miller, assistant professor of history/political science.

Faculty panelists drawn from this past year’s Centennial Colloquia Series field a question from the audience. From left are Dorothy J. Gerring and Robert A. Wozniak, associate professors of architectural technology; Lisa R. Bock, assistant professor of computer information technology; Mark D. Noe, professor of English-composition; Rob Cooley, assistant professor of anthropology/environmental science; and Craig A. Miller, assistant professor of history/political science.

A biometric image on a smartphone – technology only recently embraced by Bock (third from left) – recalls her September lecture on identity protection.

A biometric image on a smartphone – technology only recently embraced by Bock (third from left) – recalls her September lecture on identity protection.

While recognizing the role of technology in effecting change, Gerring said it is but one factor in converting public will into progressive action.

While recognizing the role of technology in effecting change, Gerring said it is but one factor in converting public will into progressive action.

Nursing major Sadie E. Bebko, of Allegany, N.Y., defends her generation against the suggestion that reliance on technology has left her peers unable to read a map or finish a book. While she and her peers avail themselves of shortcuts, she rebutted, they are more than capable of processing and retaining the complex information necessary to be critical thinkers and responsible citizens.

Nursing major Sadie E. Bebko, of Allegany, N.Y., defends her generation against the suggestion that reliance on technology has left her peers unable to read a map or finish a book. While she and her peers avail themselves of shortcuts, she rebutted, they are more than capable of processing and retaining the complex information necessary to be critical thinkers and responsible citizens.

Six Penn College faculty members, who combined for four enlightening and provocative lectures during 2014’s Centennial Colloquia Series, reconvened on campus Wednesday night for a roundtable recap. The discussion, titled “Riding the Wave of Technological Change: Revolution or Evolution?” was held in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium. The group (Dorothy J. Gerring, Robert A. Wozniak, Lisa R. Bock, Mark D. Noe, Rob Cooley and Craig A. Miller) ably kicked around the connection between technology and progress, entertaining questions from moderator James E. Cunningham and the audience.
Photos by Elizabeth S. Greis, student photographer

Countdown to the Centennial logo

2014 marks a milestone in the institution's rich history, from the inception of adult classes in the Williamsport Area School District in 1914, through its evolution into Williamsport Technical Institute, Williamsport Area Community College, and present-day Pennsylvania College of Technology. Read about the institution's history →

Graphic Design Students, Alumni Win Advertising Accolades

The "Lucky Break Lanes" logo earned Brenna C. Richner, '14 graphic design, an Award of Distinction from American Graphic Design & Advertising's annual awards competition. The entry was also a finalist in the "Best of Category Award" for logos.

Four seniors enrolled in graphic design at Pennsylvania College of Technology and three graphic design alumni recently earned recognition in the American Graphic Design & Advertising awards, a national competition recognizing excellence in design by professionals and students.

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Roundtable to Continue Discussion of Technology and Society

Pennsylvania College of Technology will continue the dialogue engendered by its Centennial Colloquia Series – designed to explore the impact of technology on society – by hosting a roundtable discussion with the series’ faculty presenters.

Scheduled for Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium, the discussion is titled “Riding the Wave of Technological Change: Revolution or Evolution?”

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Penn College Engages in STEM Awareness in Tioga County

Justin M. Ingram, assistant professor of biology at Penn College, center, shares scientific insights with Tioga County eighth graders at the STEM Awareness Career Day.

A biology professor and an assistant dean from the School of Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications at Pennsylvania College of Technology presented at the first STEM Awareness Career Day, held recently at Wellsboro Area High School’s administration building.

Conducted by the Tioga County Development Corp. in conjunction with Shell Appalachia and several other organizations, the event drew approximately 530 Tioga County eighth-graders from all three county school districts – Northern Tioga, Southern Tioga and Wellsboro.

Justin M. Ingram, assistant professor of biology (anatomy and physiology), and Michael J. Reed, assistant dean of sciences, humanities and visual communications: liberal arts and sciences, were among educators offering insights into the exciting opportunities available in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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Scholarship Memorializes Penn College Faculty Member

John J. Messer, an associate professor of Web and interactive media, is clearly in his element in this Spring 2014 lab photo.

Friends and family of John J. Messer, a Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member who fought a courageous battle against brain cancer, have established a scholarship fund in his memory.

Messer, who taught in Penn College’s Web and interactive media major, died Jan. 5 – barely two weeks before his 50th birthday. The clinical trial that extended his life and the inspirational way in which he maintained his optimism against the odds, were featured in the Spring 2013 issue of the college’s One College Avenue magazine.

The scholarship fund was started by a group of John’s longtime friends from his college years in Oneonta, New York.

“In keeping with John’s mantra of ‘eyes forward,’ we wanted to create a continuing legacy so that his inspiration and influence could live on,” some of those friends said in a joint statement. “Penn College and his students were very important to John. Our hope is that this scholarship will allow future generations of Penn College students the benefit of being touched by John’s selflessness and positive energy.”

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‘Celebration of Life Fundraiser’ to Be Held Jan. 17 for Faculty Member

John J. Messer (center), assistant professor of Web and interactive media, with students

John J. Messer (center), assistant professor of Web and interactive media, with students

The Jan. 5 death of John J. Messer, an assistant professor of Web and interactive media and a Penn College faculty member since January 2002, has been announced by the School of Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications. A celebration of his life – and a fundraiser to benefit the Geisinger Health System Foundation for Brain Tumor Research – will be held by his family at 3 p.m. Jan. 17 in the Mountain Laurel Room of the Thompson Professional Development Center. Messer’s long and valiant battle against glioblastoma multiforme, which was diagnosed in November 2010, was featured in the Spring 2013 issue of One College Avenue magazine. Coinciding with what would have been his 50th birthday the following day, the Jan. 17 event will include a basket raffle and a variety of other activities intended to boost donations to brain-cancer research. Contributions to the Geisinger Foundation can be made online or at the PDC; checks should note “Brain Tumor Research in Honor of John Messer” on the memo line. Anyone wishing to contribute items for the fundraiser is asked to contact Pat Coulter, Denise Leete or Lisa Bock.

Scholarship Honors Professor Emeritus at Penn College

Darryl and Dawn Kehrer

Two alumni of Pennsylvania College of Technology’s immediate predecessor institution have established a scholarship honoring Daniel J. Doyle, professor emeritus of history and a former administrator at the college.

Darryl and Dawn (Wahler) Kehrer, both 1972 liberal arts graduates of Williamsport Area Community College, have endowed a scholarship in honor of Doyle.

“The annual award is an enduring way to honor Dan Doyle’s nearly four decades of commitment to Penn College students,” Darryl Kehrer said.

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Human Services Students Donate Funds to Veterans Group

From left: Jenice L. Phillips-Harrold, Williamsport; Amanda R. Tyler, Brockport; Erin L. Sullivan, Elizabethtown; Chad E. Hahn (presenter), Hughesville; Paul Spurgin (recipient), Keystone Wounded Warriors; Travis S. Draper, Williamsport; LaQuinn N. Thompson, York; April M. Tucker, Muncy; Jessica J. Eisely, Middleburg; Brittany E. Goldinger, Bainbridge; Chelsea D. Woodland, State College; Meagan R. Kolk, Blossburg; Deborah E. Wells, Montoursville; and Stacey L. French, Montoursville. Goldinger is a human services major; the rest are enrolled in applied human services.

Students enrolled in a Community and Organizational Change class at Pennsylvania College of Technology raised more than $3,000 for a worldwide fair-trade organization and donated a portion of their sales to a veterans group based in Berks County.

The human services class conducted a Ten Thousand Villages sale last month and was permitted to donate 10 percent of its sales total to another nonprofit of its choice. The class chose Keystone Wounded Warriors Inc., of Blandon.

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Sociology Faculty Members Present at Conference

Faculty members present paper

Two sociology faculty members at Pennsylvania College of Technology presented a paper at the 64th annual meeting of the Pennsylvania Sociological Society, held Oct. 25 at Lebanon Valley College, Annville.

Vinay Bahl, associate professor of sociology, and Richard Sahn, instructor of psychology/sociology, presented “Sociopathic Institutions: The Reasons for ‘Moral Monday’ in North Carolina.”

The discussion focused on the protests that began in Raleigh in 2013 and evolved into a grassroots social injustice movement that spread to other states in 2014, as well as on the role legislative institutions may play in enacting laws and policies leading to such protests.

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Handcrafted Goods Available at Student-Arranged Sale

Ten Thousand Villages sale transforms CC lobby into an international bazaar.

Ten Thousand Villages sale transforms CC lobby into an international bazaar.

Holiday ornaments among sale items ...

Holiday ornaments among sale items …

... along with jewelry ...

… along with jewelry …

... and a line of basketry all the way to the elevator.

… and a line of basketry all the way to the elevator.

Sale continues through Friday

Sale continues through Friday

The annual fair-trade sale organized by human services students in the Community and Organizational Change course is being held through Friday in the lobby of Penn College’s Bush Campus Center. The Ten Thousand Villages Festival sale features artisanal items from various other countries’ working poor.
Photos by Abdullah H. Muaddi, student photographer

Colloquium Highlights Consideration of Context Over Memorization of Dates

Under the lights of the ACC Auditorium dome (and the glow from the projection screen and students' electronic devices), a sizable crowd gathers for the final Centennial Colloquium.

Under the lights of the ACC Auditorium dome (and the glow from the projection screen and students’ electronic devices), a sizable crowd gathers for the final Centennial Colloquium.

Craig A. Miller offers an overview of the technological, economic, environmental and cultural issues that surrounded construction of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railways – including displacement of American Indians.

Craig A. Miller offers an overview of the technological, economic, environmental and cultural issues that surrounded construction of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railways – including displacement of American Indians.

Miller responds to an audience question about the ultimate impact of automation on the workforce, optimistically saying that, while technology will continue to alter the way we live and work, humans will always be involved.

Miller responds to an audience question about the ultimate impact of automation on the workforce, optimistically saying that, while technology will continue to alter the way we live and work, humans will always be involved.

The college's Centennial is drawing to a close, but Miller – along with the five other Penn College faculty members who contributed to the enlightening colloquia series – will reconvene for a panel discussion in February.

The college’s Centennial is drawing to a close, but Miller – along with the five other Penn College faculty members who contributed to the enlightening colloquia series – will reconvene for a panel discussion in February.

Past and present meet as Miller time-travels across the stage, introducing his audience to Thomas C. Durant, vice president of the Union Pacific Railroad.

Past and present meet as Miller time-travels across the stage, introducing his audience to Thomas C. Durant, vice president of the Union Pacific Railroad.

Defining history as a “conversation between the past and the present … and almost always about the future,” faculty member Craig A. Miller delivered the concluding lecture in Penn College’s Centennial Colloquia Series on Tuesday night. The assistant professor of history and political science discussed “Technology, Power and Responsibility” in the Klump Academic Center Auditorium, engaging his audience the same way he challenges his students: “I’m not here to teach you history. I’m here to use history to teach you to be critical thinkers.” So while the presentation was shaped around the construction of the transcontinental railroad, that story served as a thought-provoking springboard to the broader connection between choices and consequences. Cross-country rail service was “truly a technological marvel” steeped in progress and industrial speed, he said, a monumental achievement that was not without fallout. True, it ushered in an era of development and helped the United States become a global economic power. But the territorial expansion also relocated Native Americans under a policy of “assimilate or move,” fostered financial chicanery and altered the workforce. In an informed give-and-take, Miller urged attendees to vigilantly weigh multiple perspectives, to logically and critically analyze the societal price of decisions, and to “accept uncomfortable truths and learn from them.” The hourlong program, introduced and moderated by Paul L. Starkey, vice president for academic affairs and provost, was followed by a question-and-answer session and a reception in Wrapture.

Countdown to the Centennial logo

2014 marks a milestone in the institution's rich history, from the inception of adult classes in the Williamsport Area School District in 1914, through its evolution into Williamsport Technical Institute, Williamsport Area Community College, and present-day Pennsylvania College of Technology. Read about the institution's history →

Human Services Students Host Ten Thousand Villages Sale

Unique handmade gifts from diverse cultures are available at the Ten Thousand Villages Festival Sale, set for Nov. 19-21 at Pennsylvania College of Technology's Bush Campus Center.

Students in a human services class at Pennsylvania College of Technology will host a fair-trade sale Nov. 19-21 in the lobby of the Bush Campus Center.

The annual sale, which is open to the public, helps working poor in other countries.

Facilitated by students in the Community and Organizational Change course, the Ten Thousand Villages Festival Sale will feature unique handmade gifts, jewelry, home decor, art and sculpture, textiles, serveware, and personal accessories representing the diverse cultures of artisans in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

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Lecture to Examine Responsibilities of Technological Innovation

Craig A. Miller

Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member Craig A. Miller will present the concluding lecture in the college’s Centennial Colloquia Series on Nov. 18 at 7 p.m.

Miller, an assistant professor of history/political science, will offer a talk titled “Technology, Power and Responsibility” in the college’s Klump Academic Center Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public.

At a college of applied technology, Miller says, it is important to discuss and assess the responsibilities associated with technological innovation.

To illustrate the maxim “choices have consequences,” Miller will evaluate the technological, economic, environmental and cultural issues that surrounded the construction of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railways, a massive undertaking that involved technological innovation, colossal financing, unique labor arrangements and the displacement of American Indians from Minnesota to California.

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Countdown to the Centennial logo

2014 marks a milestone in the institution's rich history, from the inception of adult classes in the Williamsport Area School District in 1914, through its evolution into Williamsport Technical Institute, Williamsport Area Community College, and present-day Pennsylvania College of Technology. Read about the institution's history →

Students Among ‘Evacuees’ in County Disaster Simulation

Tommie L. Smith (with clipboard), of Montgomery, an accounting student who works with the Lycoming County Emergency Management Agency, gathers biographical information from Ronald D. Parks, of Jersey Shore, an emergency management technology major simulating contamination with radiation particles. Among others involved in the exercise, in which Parks had to be "decontaminated" before joining the general population in the mass-care shelter, is Charles E. O'Brien Jr. (background), a Penn College Police officer.

Tommie L. Smith (with clipboard), of Montgomery, an accounting student who works with the Lycoming County Emergency Management Agency, gathers biographical information from Ronald D. Parks, of Jersey Shore, an emergency management technology major simulating contamination with radiation particles. Among others involved in the exercise, in which Parks had to be “decontaminated” before joining the general population in the mass-care shelter, is Charles E. O’Brien Jr. (background), a Penn College Police officer.

A mock evacuation site is in full swing in the halls of Montoursville Area High School.

A mock evacuation site is in full swing in the halls of Montoursville Area High School.

Kyle G. Stavinski, an emergency medical services major from Elysburg, undergoes radiological "screening" during the Lycoming County drill.

Kyle G. Stavinski, an emergency medical services major from Elysburg, undergoes radiological “screening” during the Lycoming County drill.

Ten Penn College students – eight from the emergency management technology major and two from the paramedic program – attended this week’s disaster exercise hosted by the Lycoming County Emergency Management Agency. The scenario, held at Montoursville Area High School and featuring involvement by the American Red Cross, was based on a nuclear accident at PPL’s Susquehanna Steam Electric Station near Berwick. Students role-played being evacuees from the zone surrounding the nuclear power plant and underwent simulated radiological testing and monitoring.
Photos provided by David E. Bjorkman, instructor of emergency management technology

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