News about Welding

Welding Project Adds Artful Decor to Campus Dining

Student volunteers (from left): Logan K. Garvey, of Williamsport; Gabriel M. Round, of Butler; Bailey K. Austerberry, of Pitman; Michael R. Allen, of Laughlintown; Sawyer G. Macurdy, of Cabot; Jessica L. Szejk, of Clearfield; Kyle X. Beam, of New Freedom; David P. Young, of Spring Mills; Michael K. Patterson, welding lecturer and project leader; Albert M. Gensel, of Canton; and Hunter M. Comeau, of Freeport.

Patterson and Charles J. Stopper, carpenter/maintenance worker, hold a panel while Dale E. Henne, carpenter/maintenance lead person, marks the wall.

Patterson shows off his design.

Henne (left) and Stopper (right) place a panel with help from Thomas A. Linn, maintenance mechanic/carpenter/locksmith/engraver.

A group of welding students volunteered alongside welding lecturer Michael K. Patterson to fashion impressive new wall art for the Keystone Dining Room. The students met between classes two days a week for two semesters to complete the artwork that was arranged by Crissy L. McGinness, director of dining services, and designed by Patterson. The silverware handles in the hanging panels reflect the styling of new chairs in the facility. “When we looked at the space, we wanted colors that were a little more industrial,” McGinness said. “I love that it was made by students.” To create the artwork, the students removed mill scale from sheets of mild steel – supplied by McGinness – and allowed them to rust in rainwater. Cutlery shapes were cut by hand, and, after freehand texture grinding added dimension, the artwork was again allowed to rust, transforming the grind marks to a golden color. “Rainwater works so well because it has so much acid in it,” Patterson said. The final step was applying a spar urethane. Among the volunteers was Kyle X. Beam, a sophomore in welding and fabrication engineering technology and a New Freedom resident. “It was a chance to hang out and do something different; to do a group project,” he said. Patterson said the work provided the volunteers “a totally different way of looking at metal.” “None of the kids have done anything like this before,” he added. The artwork was installed by General Services on April 20.
First and third photos by Amy S. Lingg, Dining Services marketing assistant

Welders Pique Career Interest for Daughters, Sons

Michael K. Patterson shows how the heat of a torch can change the color of metal.

Future Wildcats, perhaps?

Matt W. Nolan offers a mini-primer in Metal Inert Gas welding.

Forty young men and women, potential Penn College students all, participated in Thursday’s 23rd annual “Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day.” This year’s national theme was “Sparking ‘Aha!’ Moments,” and what better venue for cultivating a sense of working-world wonderment than the college’s welding labs? Four faculty members – Jacob B. Holland, Matt W. Nolan, Michael K. Patterson and Timothy S. Turnbach – and students in the Avco Lycoming Metal Trades Center led visitors in career-focused activities through demonstrations of various welding processes. The daylong event (financially supported by the President’s Office and organized with the help of David R. Cotner, dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies) also included a campus tour with Student Ambassadors, lunch in Dauphin Hall and afternoon job-shadowing with parents and other adult mentors. Paul L. Starkey, vice president for academic affairs/provost, welcomed the group; others assisting in the day were Dining Services, Information Technology Services, and the Admissions, Professional Development, and Public Relations & Marketing offices.
Photos by Tina R. Strayer, on-boarding/professional development manager

Historic Number of Penn College Students Headed to Nationals

SkillsUSA Pennsylvania

Seventeen first-place winners from Pennsylvania College of Technology have advanced to the 52nd annual National SkillsUSA Conference, to be held from June 20-24 in Louisville, Kentucky.

Three other students finished in the top four places in their respective categories during the SkillsUSA Pennsylvania Leadership and Skills Conference held earlier this month in Hershey.

“I feel great about the students’ performance at the state competition. It goes to show how well-prepared the students are from their respective fields and how great our instructors are here at the college,” said James N. Colton II, assistant professor of welding and the college’s SkillsUSA adviser. “This is, by far, the most diverse group of students I’ve had go to the competition. The national competition gives us a chance to showcase our technical skills and show everyone why we’re a leader in applied technology. I hope next year we can increase the number going to nationals and continue to make the college proud.”

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Students Travel to Lebanon to Serve in Children’s Home

Penn College students George Settle III, of Dillsburg, second from left, and Tyler D. Hodge, of Gillett, standing third from left, interact with residents and staff of Home of Hope, near Beirut, Lebanon. At right is Noah George, a missionary who supervised the students.

During their Winter Break, a pair of Pennsylvania College of Technology students traveled to Lebanon, where they spent two weeks volunteering at a children’s home near Beirut.

George Settle III, a student in the welding and fabrication engineering technology major, and Tyler D. Hodge, who is studying building automation technology, stayed, worked and played at Home of Hope in the village of Kehale, Lebanon, about 10 miles from Beirut. The home provides shelter, education, socialization and recreation for street children, many who have been abused or abandoned.

While there, Settle, who hails from Dillsburg, used his welding know-how in the home’s shop, where he worked with a few of the boys to build two steel picnic tables and four steel-framed dining-room tables, along with some smaller projects.

Hodge, a resident of Gillett, spent much of his time helping to clean and organize donations received during the Christmas season.

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Father’s Industry Insights Help Lead Texan to Penn College

Stone Skinkle-Howard in the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies welding lab ...

The first time Stone Skinkle-Howard set foot on Pennsylvania College of Technology’s campus, the Texan didn’t think to bring a coat. The unforgiving temperatures on that brisk March day in 2014 made him regret the oversight but not the visit. The prospective welding student quickly discovered that the college met his high expectations.

Those expectations were formed 1,500 miles from Williamsport in Missouri City, Texas, by his father, Michael Skinkle, a welding engineer at Fluor Corp., a global engineering, procurement and construction company. His dad made Skinkle-Howard consider Penn College and its bachelor’s degree in welding and fabrication engineering technology.

“People my dad has worked with speak very highly of Penn College,” Skinkle-Howard said. “That’s what made him say, ‘Check it out.’”

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March 30 Awards Banquet Awaits Premier Student Welders

A sweet hat for a serious craftsman.

Hosts and judges are joined by postsecondary students ...

... and competitors from regional high schools.

Vying to be among the day's top welders

The annual American Welding Society Section 105 welding contest, a competition for both high school and postsecondary students, was held last week in Penn College’s Avco Metal Trades Center. There are three high school welding programs within the boundaries of AWS Section 105. each of which have 18 to 20 students in their respective programs. The instructors hold in-house contests to winnow their students to six to bring to the college the day of the contest. The top six place-winners are invited to a dinner March 30 in the Thompson Professional Development Center, where they will find where they placed and receive prizes. The college program started with around 100 students who competed in individual classes, where they were eliminated to four students per section or 24 total students. The top six college students will also be invited to the awards dinner, which will also be attended by the AWS president.
Photos by Zachery T. Kane, student photographer

‘Haunted Welding Lab’ Turns On Friday Night Frights

Welding lab becomes Halloween haunt

Arc Asylum, a “haunted” Halloween attraction, will be held from 7-10 p.m. Friday in the welding lab (Room A132 of the Avco-Lycoming Metal Trades Center). Admission is $5 per person, and at least one person in each group of six must have a valid Penn College ID. Family and friends are welcome; there is a parental advisory for children 12 and younger.

Website Charts Welding Major’s Course From Elective to Career

Stephanie M. Puckly

The latest post by the CEO and founder of Smart College Visit features Stephanie M. Puckly, who has found a “perfect fit” in Penn College’s welding and fabrication engineering technology major. “For a girl who originally had her sight set on becoming a doctor, the combination of hands-on learning in the lab and rigorous coursework in math and science was exactly what she sought and expected from her college experience,” writes Z. Kelly Queijo, who visited campus in July. Puckly, of Spartansburg, is expected to graduate in 2017 from the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

Number of ‘Tech Scholars’ Grows at Penn College

Penn College Tech Scholars include (from left): Logan T. Beidleman, Hope Mills, N.C.; Nicholas C. Moore, Lock Haven; Kelsey L. Shaak, Quakertown; Brandon A. Biesecker, Waynesboro; Connor L. Winslow, Blanchard; Christopher R. Zimpelman, Reading; Alexander M. Barlow, Hanover; Ethan M. Yoder, Denver; and Colton A. Laughman, New Oxford. Not pictured: Rylee A. Butler, Bellefonte; Margot S. Rinehart, Downingtown; and Thomas P. Tyler, Vienna, Md. (Photo by David S. Richards, professor of physics)

With support from the National Science Foundation, the number of Tech Scholars at Pennsylvania College of Technology continues to grow. Eight new students in STEM majors have been awarded scholarships of up to $10,000 per year for a maximum of four years.

Those students join four returning scholarship recipients from 2014, the first year of a five-year grant designed to increase retention, degree completion and career preparation for students in the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

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State Legislator Gets to Know Penn College During Campus Visit

Sens. Vogel (center) and Yaw (right) talk with David R. Cotner, dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies, in the college's welding laboratory.

Brass candlesticks pique the lawmakers' interest during a stop in the automated manufacturing lab.

Vogel gets behind the wheel of a 1929 Duesenberg Model J Victoria, powered by a Lycoming engine and being restored by Penn College students – including Ian M. Bachleda, of Schaefferstown – for the William E. Swigart Jr. Automobile Museum in Huntingdon.

State Sen. Elder Vogel Jr., whose 47th District encompasses Lawrence County and parts of Beaver and Butler counties, got acquainted with Penn College during a tour of main campus Wednesday afternoon. A legislator since 2009, Vogel chairs the Agriculture & Rural Affairs Committee, and is a member of the Appropriations, Banking & Insurance, Communications & Technology, Environmental Resources & Energy, Local Government, and Majority Policy committees. Accompanied by state Sen. Gene Yaw (chairman of the college’s board of directors) and members of the administration, among others, Vogel got a close look at instructional areas for welding, automated manufacturing, collision repair, automotive restoration, and mechatronics. He also visited a natural gas wellhead used by ShaleNET U.S. in the Center for Business & Workforce Development.

DCED Gets Firsthand Look at College’s Responsiveness to Industry

Anne K. Soucy, assistant professor of plastics technology, and Gary E. McQuay, engineering manager for the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center, show visitors the afternoon project for students in the Blow Molding course.

Dave Cotner, dean of industrial, computing & engineering technologies, talks about the college’s automated manufacturing and machining majors.

Front row: Shannon M. Munro, executive director of Penn College Workforce Development & Continuing Education, and Carol Kilko, special assistant for DCED’s Agency Development Initiatives; second row: Neil Weaver, executive deputy secretary for DCED, Tracy L. Brundage, the college’s vice president for workforce development, and Steve D’Ettorre, director of policy for DCED; back row, David C. Pistner, director of special projects for Penn College Workforce Development & Continuing Education, and Tom Venditti, director of WEDnetPA.

Representatives of Pennsylvania’s Department of Community & Economic Development toured several areas of Penn College’s campuses Tuesday. The contingent was hosted by Workforce Development & Continuing Education at Penn College. Throughout their visit, they saw firsthand the hands-on learning taking place in the college’s labs and learned how the college works with industry, the college benefiting from industry input on curriculum as well as in-kind and monetary donations, and industry benefiting from knowledgeable graduates and customized training and product-development support. Tour stops included the Schneebeli Earth Science Center; Energy Technology & Education Center; Plastics Innovation & Resource Center; and the advanced manufacturing, rapid prototyping, welding, machining, mechatronics, well-trainer, plastics, and electronics and computer engineering labs.

An Artist’s Journey to Engineering

Hannah Michelle is at home in the welding lab …

… and in the painting studio. In both places, using her hands to create comes naturally.

From the Fall 2015 edition of One College Avenue, Penn College’s official magazine: Student Hannah Michelle Scheimreif links the seemingly opposite disciplines of studio art and welding and fabrication engineering technology. “In engineering, you’re solving problems and coming up with new ideas, and in art, you’re solving problems and coming up with new ideas,” she said. “It coalesces very nicely.” Read “Double Major

WBRE Broadcasts News Report About Unique Welding Project

Steven P. Johnson talks about the "talent, teamwork and family" that are hallmarks of Penn College, Little League and Susquehanna Health.

Eyewitness News’ Cody Butler interviewed Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour and Susquehanna Health President and CEO Steven P. Johnson on Friday about the welded baseball glove installed this week outside the Hospitality Inn at Williamsport Regional Medical Center. His piece debuted during WBRE’s 5:30 p.m. newscast that evening.

Wondrous Welder Creates Ball-Glove Benchmark for Outdoor Art

A battery of helpers maneuvers the heavy handiwork into place.

Michael K. Patterson (left) with student assistant Jacob D. Poppel, of Burlington, Connecticut, a welding and fabrication engineering technology major.

A leathery look and Patterson's eye for detail lend realism to a larger-than-life enterprise.

Installed in timely fashion during the Little League Baseball World Series, the bench offers a picturesque perch.

A member of Penn College’s welding faculty, whose procession of “Student Bodies” continues to spark on-campus conversation, this week added another impressive page to his portfolio of community contributions. Michael K. Patterson worked all summer on a bench for Susquehanna Health, an oversized replica of a baseball glove he used in Little League (and has retained to this day). The welded bench weighs more than 600 pounds and swivels 360 degrees on a shaft and apparatus designed and produced by students in the college’s machining lab. It was installed Tuesday afternoon at the front entrance to the Hospitality Inn at Williamsport Regional Medical Center, which provides free accommodations to eligible patients’ families. The renovated/expanded facility, at 802 Campbell St., will be formally dedicated in mid-September. The glove accentuates the baseball theme inside and furthers the ties among Penn College, Little League and the health system. An anonymous donor provided funding for the materials and for the balance of Patterson’s time that he didn’t donate to the project. Although the bulk of the work occurred after spring classes ended, the faculty member had some assistance from students. Patterson’s civic presence also includes a sculpture on the South Williamsport side of the Susquehanna River Walk, near Maynard Street, and public artwork at West Fourth and Market streets.

Five Penn College Students Earn Gold Medals at SkillsUSA Nationals

Penn College's SkillsUSA contingent recently returned from national competition with five first-place medals. Front row, from left: Kyle T. Potts, of Colver; Randall J. Haynes, Julian; Ian M. Dorman, Mill Hall; and Bradley L. Hayden, Milton, Vermont. Second row, from left: Matthew R. Harman Jr., Sellersville; Jerome T. Czachor, Dickson City; Kenneth J. "Jeremy" Williams, Westminster, Maryland; and adviser James N. Colton II. Instructor Michael Damiani is in the back row.

Five students from Pennsylvania College of Technology earned first-place medals during the 51st annual National SkillsUSA Conference, held recently in Louisville, Kentucky.

Bringing home the gold – and bringing to 40 the number of top Penn College winners in national competition over the years – were Matthew R. Harman Jr., of Sellersville; Randall J. Haynes, of Julian; and Ian M. Dorman, of Mill Hall, who competed as a team in the Automated Manufacturing Technology category; Kyle T. Potts, of Colver, Technical Drafting; and Bradley L. Hayden, of Milton, Vermont, Welding.

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