News about Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies

Association Recertifies Engineering CAD Technology Major

Penn College’s engineering CAD technology major was recertified recently by the American Design Drafting Association.

The American Design Drafting Association recently recognized the excellence of Pennsylvania College of Technology’s engineering CAD technology major with industry recertification.

“Recertification by the ADDA is a very important credential for our program, and we are proud to have earned it annually since 1997,” said Katherine A. Walker, assistant professor of engineering design technology.

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DCED Gets Firsthand Look at College’s Responsiveness to Industry

Anne K. Soucy, assistant professor of plastics technology, and Gary E. McQuay, engineering manager for the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center, show visitors the afternoon project for students in the Blow Molding course.

Dave Cotner, dean of industrial, computing & engineering technologies, talks about the college’s automated manufacturing and machining majors.

Front row: Shannon M. Munro, executive director of Penn College Workforce Development & Continuing Education, and Carol Kilko, special assistant for DCED’s Agency Development Initiatives; second row: Neil Weaver, executive deputy secretary for DCED, Tracy L. Brundage, the college’s vice president for workforce development, and Steve D’Ettorre, director of policy for DCED; back row, David C. Pistner, director of special projects for Penn College Workforce Development & Continuing Education, and Tom Venditti, director of WEDnetPA.

Representatives of Pennsylvania’s Department of Community & Economic Development toured several areas of Penn College’s campuses Tuesday. The contingent was hosted by Workforce Development & Continuing Education at Penn College. Throughout their visit, they saw firsthand the hands-on learning taking place in the college’s labs and learned how the college works with industry, the college benefiting from industry input on curriculum as well as in-kind and monetary donations, and industry benefiting from knowledgeable graduates and customized training and product-development support. Tour stops included the Schneebeli Earth Science Center; Energy Technology & Education Center; Plastics Innovation & Resource Center; and the advanced manufacturing, rapid prototyping, welding, machining, mechatronics, well-trainer, plastics, and electronics and computer engineering labs.

An Artist’s Journey to Engineering

Hannah Michelle is at home in the welding lab …

… and in the painting studio. In both places, using her hands to create comes naturally.

From the Fall 2015 edition of One College Avenue, Penn College’s official magazine: Student Hannah Michelle Scheimreif links the seemingly opposite disciplines of studio art and welding and fabrication engineering technology. “In engineering, you’re solving problems and coming up with new ideas, and in art, you’re solving problems and coming up with new ideas,” she said. “It coalesces very nicely.” Read “Double Major

WBRE Broadcasts News Report About Unique Welding Project

Steven P. Johnson talks about the "talent, teamwork and family" that are hallmarks of Penn College, Little League and Susquehanna Health.

Eyewitness News’ Cody Butler interviewed Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour and Susquehanna Health President and CEO Steven P. Johnson on Friday about the welded baseball glove installed this week outside the Hospitality Inn at Williamsport Regional Medical Center. His piece debuted during WBRE’s 5:30 p.m. newscast that evening.

Wondrous Welder Creates Ball-Glove Benchmark for Outdoor Art

A battery of helpers maneuvers the heavy handiwork into place.

Michael K. Patterson (left) with student assistant Jacob D. Poppel, of Burlington, Connecticut, a welding and fabrication engineering technology major.

A leathery look and Patterson's eye for detail lend realism to a larger-than-life enterprise.

Installed in timely fashion during the Little League Baseball World Series, the bench offers a picturesque perch.

A member of Penn College’s welding faculty, whose procession of “Student Bodies” continues to spark on-campus conversation, this week added another impressive page to his portfolio of community contributions. Michael K. Patterson worked all summer on a bench for Susquehanna Health, an oversized replica of a baseball glove he used in Little League (and has retained to this day). The welded bench weighs more than 600 pounds and swivels 360 degrees on a shaft and apparatus designed and produced by students in the college’s machining lab. It was installed Tuesday afternoon at the front entrance to the Hospitality Inn at Williamsport Regional Medical Center, which provides free accommodations to eligible patients’ families. The renovated/expanded facility, at 802 Campbell St., will be formally dedicated in mid-September. The glove accentuates the baseball theme inside and furthers the ties among Penn College, Little League and the health system. An anonymous donor provided funding for the materials and for the balance of Patterson’s time that he didn’t donate to the project. Although the bulk of the work occurred after spring classes ended, the faculty member had some assistance from students. Patterson’s civic presence also includes a sculpture on the South Williamsport side of the Susquehanna River Walk, near Maynard Street, and public artwork at West Fourth and Market streets.

Alumnus Helps to Improve Access to Safe Water in Rural India

“Headloading” fresh water requires several trips a day and can cause physical ailments. Photo courtesy of Wello

A woman demonstrates WaterWheel 2.5, a rolling water tank that eases the daily burden of fetching water in rural India. Photo courtesy of Wello

Jason C. Gross, '05, plastics and polymer engineering technology

From the Fall 2015 issue of One College Avenue magazine: In rural India, women travel sometimes miles to retrieve safe, clean drinking water for their families, carrying a gallon or two at a time in pots atop their heads. Penn College plastics graduate Jason C. Gross, ’05, helped to ease that burden by lending his expertise to a unique product. Read ‘Clean Water to Go’

Penn College Boasts Another ‘Rising Star’ in Plastics Industry

Matthew K. Peterman

Plastics News has included a second Penn College graduate among its “Rising Stars” in the industry: Matthew K. Peterman, who earned a bachelor’s degree in plastics and polymer engineering technology in May. Peterman, an award-winning Resident Assistant during his Penn College years, is a manufacturing development engineer/operations rotation engineer with TE Connectivity Ltd. in Winston-Salem, N.C. “Look around and grasp fully how much of your everyday life is affected by plastics,” the Phoenixville native said. “If you can understand that plastics has driven the advancement of our society since its initial introduction, then you will understand how amazing it can be to be part of the industry. The only limit in the plastics industry is how far you want to go and how much you want to put into it.” As reported earlier, classmate Ryan N. Troiano was also selected.

Industry Publication Features Q&A With Plastics Alum

Ryan N. Troiano

Ryan N. Troiano, who earned a bachelor’s degree in plastics and polymer engineering technology from Penn College in May, was recently featured as an industry “Rising Star” in a trade publication. Plastics News profiled Troiano, originally from Lake Ariel, employed as a title development and project engineer with Greiner Packaging Corp. in Pittston. “I became interested in the plastics industry after an open house at Penn College, when I saw all of the processing/lab equipment and heard about other students’ experiences,” said Troiano, who was awarded multiple industry scholarships while at the college.

Assistant Dean Appointed at Penn College

Bradley M. Webb

Bradley M. Webb has been named an assistant dean at Pennsylvania College of Technology.

Formerly the director of student affairs administration, Webb recently assumed duties as an assistant dean for the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

“Brad is an outstanding addition to the school’s leadership team with his work ethic, creativity, energy and proven organizational skills,” said Paul L. Starkey, vice president for academic affairs/provost. “He has always demonstrated an unwavering commitment to the college and our students.”

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Five Penn College Students Earn Gold Medals at SkillsUSA Nationals

Penn College's SkillsUSA contingent recently returned from national competition with five first-place medals. Front row, from left: Kyle T. Potts, of Colver; Randall J. Haynes, Julian; Ian M. Dorman, Mill Hall; and Bradley L. Hayden, Milton, Vermont. Second row, from left: Matthew R. Harman Jr., Sellersville; Jerome T. Czachor, Dickson City; Kenneth J. "Jeremy" Williams, Westminster, Maryland; and adviser James N. Colton II. Instructor Michael Damiani is in the back row.

Five students from Pennsylvania College of Technology earned first-place medals during the 51st annual National SkillsUSA Conference, held recently in Louisville, Kentucky.

Bringing home the gold – and bringing to 40 the number of top Penn College winners in national competition over the years – were Matthew R. Harman Jr., of Sellersville; Randall J. Haynes, of Julian; and Ian M. Dorman, of Mill Hall, who competed as a team in the Automated Manufacturing Technology category; Kyle T. Potts, of Colver, Technical Drafting; and Bradley L. Hayden, of Milton, Vermont, Welding.

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CPWDC Supports Penn College’s SMART Girls Camp

At Penn College’s SMART Girls summer camp, Amanda Kelly – of Holy Spirit High School, Absecon, New Jersey – shows the 3-D-printed project she and her teammates developed. The girls pitched their fictitious business (Sirens of Sound) and product, a non-electrical amplifier for smartphones, to camp mentors as part of a “Shark Tank”-like showcase.

The Central Pennsylvania Workforce Development Corp. recently provided financial support to a Pennsylvania College of Technology initiative that helps connect teen girls with potential careers.

Penn College’s SMART (Science and Math Applications in Real World Technologies) Girls program is a four-day summer camp that provides an opportunity for girls in grades 9-11 to experience math and science as a foundation for careers in technology.

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Extrusion Workshop Renews Worldwide Spotlight on PIRC

Penn College plastics technology professor Kirk M. Cantor (second from left) engages seminar participants.

Pennsylvania College of Technology’s internationally renowned Plastics Innovation & Resource Center attracted a fitting global audience when it hosted its 17th Annual Extrusion Seminar & Hands-On Workshop, drawing attendees from the United States, Canada and Turkey.

Forty participants from 25 companies, many of them new to the industry, were led by extrusion experts Chris Rauwendaal and Penn College plastics technology professor Kirk M. Cantor in an informative three-day balance of classroom instruction and hands-on activities in the institution’s well-appointed labs.

“We have the perfect venue to host successful programs such as this seminar. Penn College has invested heavily in excellent equipment and facilities,” Cantor said. “The fact that many of our attendees come from companies that have sent people in the past is evidence that they are getting great value when they come here.

“We continue to attract attendees from all over the world. These programs are great opportunities to show off Penn College to decision-makers from across the globe.”

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Manufacturing Alum Featured Among Magazine’s Industry All-Stars

David M. Huston

David M. Huston, who graduated from Penn College in May 2010 with a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology, has been chosen among the country’s future leaders in manufacturing by a national publication. Manufacturing Engineering magazine included Huston in its recent third annual “30 Under 30” issue, which celebrates 30 people under the age of 30 who “have demonstrated exceptional talent and leadership in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics – fields that are essential underpinnings to a career in manufacturing.” Huston provided the news to the college’s Alumni Relations Office, asking that it be shared with the faculty in his major “who had such a positive influence on my schooling and career.” He also noted that the industry is putting higher demand and focus on hiring young people to replace a retiring workforce. “Penn College has given me the skill-set and knowledge to get my career off to a great start,” he wrote. “It is my firm belief that (the college) graduates premier talent with the hands-on ‘know-how’ that other colleges/universities can’t compete with.”

Automated Manufacturing, Machining Majors Renew Accreditation

National Institute for Metalworking Skills

The National Institute for Metalworking Skills has recognized the excellence of the manufacturing and machining curriculum at Pennsylvania College of Technology by renewing the college’s accreditation.

Majors covered by the accreditation are a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology, associate degrees in automated manufacturing technology and machine tool technology, and a certificate in machinist general.

“In receiving this national recognition, the college and its faculty demonstrate their continued commitment to excellence in metalworking training within the state of Pennsylvania and for the greater good of the U.S. manufacturing industry,” said Catherine L. Ross, director of accreditation for NIMS.

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State Cabinet Officials Tour Campus on ‘Jobs’ Visit

With campus beauty all around, including the "Student Bodies" art installation spanning the campus mall, the group takes a shady stroll north from the ATHS.

Stopping by the dental hygiene lab

Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour (left) walks with Secretary Manderino and others alongside the robotic welding stations.

Michael K. Patterson, a member of the college's welding faculty, scores a hit with his impressive work-in-progress: a larger-than-life baseball glove, complete with welded metal strands to simulate stitching.

Secretary Davin, at the podium

Two cabinet secretaries from Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration continued the “Jobs That Pay” tour in a Monday visit to Penn College, where they focused on workforce development and employer-training initiatives within the governor’s proposed 2015-16 budget for the commonwealth. Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis M. Davin and Department of Labor & Industry Secretary Kathy M. Manderino toured the college’s dental hygiene and welding labs, instructional areas that could benefit from a proposed increase in state appropriation. A press conference followed in the welding lab.