News about Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies

Assistant Dean Appointed at Penn College

Bradley M. Webb

Bradley M. Webb has been named an assistant dean at Pennsylvania College of Technology.

Formerly the director of student affairs administration, Webb recently assumed duties as an assistant dean for the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

“Brad is an outstanding addition to the school’s leadership team with his work ethic, creativity, energy and proven organizational skills,” said Paul L. Starkey, vice president for academic affairs/provost. “He has always demonstrated an unwavering commitment to the college and our students.”

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Five Penn College Students Earn Gold Medals at SkillsUSA Nationals

Penn College's SkillsUSA contingent recently returned from national competition with five first-place medals. Front row, from left: Kyle T. Potts, of Colver; Randall J. Haynes, Julian; Ian M. Dorman, Mill Hall; and Bradley L. Hayden, Milton, Vermont. Second row, from left: Matthew R. Harman Jr., Sellersville; Jerome T. Czachor, Dickson City; Kenneth J. "Jeremy" Williams, Westminster, Maryland; and adviser James N. Colton II. Instructor Michael Damiani is in the back row.

Five students from Pennsylvania College of Technology earned first-place medals during the 51st annual National SkillsUSA Conference, held recently in Louisville, Kentucky.

Bringing home the gold – and bringing to 40 the number of top Penn College winners in national competition over the years – were Matthew R. Harman Jr., of Sellersville; Randall J. Haynes, of Julian; and Ian M. Dorman, of Mill Hall, who competed as a team in the Automated Manufacturing Technology category; Kyle T. Potts, of Colver, Technical Drafting; and Bradley L. Hayden, of Milton, Vermont, Welding.

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CPWDC Supports Penn College’s SMART Girls Camp

At Penn College’s SMART Girls summer camp, Amanda Kelly – of Holy Spirit High School, Absecon, New Jersey – shows the 3-D-printed project she and her teammates developed. The girls pitched their fictitious business (Sirens of Sound) and product, a non-electrical amplifier for smartphones, to camp mentors as part of a “Shark Tank”-like showcase.

The Central Pennsylvania Workforce Development Corp. recently provided financial support to a Pennsylvania College of Technology initiative that helps connect teen girls with potential careers.

Penn College’s SMART (Science and Math Applications in Real World Technologies) Girls program is a four-day summer camp that provides an opportunity for girls in grades 9-11 to experience math and science as a foundation for careers in technology.

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Extrusion Workshop Renews Worldwide Spotlight on PIRC

Penn College plastics technology professor Kirk M. Cantor (second from left) engages seminar participants.

Pennsylvania College of Technology’s internationally renowned Plastics Innovation & Resource Center attracted a fitting global audience when it hosted its 17th Annual Extrusion Seminar & Hands-On Workshop, drawing attendees from the United States, Canada and Turkey.

Forty participants from 25 companies, many of them new to the industry, were led by extrusion experts Chris Rauwendaal and Penn College plastics technology professor Kirk M. Cantor in an informative three-day balance of classroom instruction and hands-on activities in the institution’s well-appointed labs.

“We have the perfect venue to host successful programs such as this seminar. Penn College has invested heavily in excellent equipment and facilities,” Cantor said. “The fact that many of our attendees come from companies that have sent people in the past is evidence that they are getting great value when they come here.

“We continue to attract attendees from all over the world. These programs are great opportunities to show off Penn College to decision-makers from across the globe.”

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Manufacturing Alum Featured Among Magazine’s Industry All-Stars

David M. Huston

David M. Huston, who graduated from Penn College in May 2010 with a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology, has been chosen among the country’s future leaders in manufacturing by a national publication. Manufacturing Engineering magazine included Huston in its recent third annual “30 Under 30” issue, which celebrates 30 people under the age of 30 who “have demonstrated exceptional talent and leadership in Science, Technology, Engineering or Mathematics – fields that are essential underpinnings to a career in manufacturing.” Huston provided the news to the college’s Alumni Relations Office, asking that it be shared with the faculty in his major “who had such a positive influence on my schooling and career.” He also noted that the industry is putting higher demand and focus on hiring young people to replace a retiring workforce. “Penn College has given me the skill-set and knowledge to get my career off to a great start,” he wrote. “It is my firm belief that (the college) graduates premier talent with the hands-on ‘know-how’ that other colleges/universities can’t compete with.”

Automated Manufacturing, Machining Majors Renew Accreditation

National Institute for Metalworking Skills

The National Institute for Metalworking Skills has recognized the excellence of the manufacturing and machining curriculum at Pennsylvania College of Technology by renewing the college’s accreditation.

Majors covered by the accreditation are a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering technology, associate degrees in automated manufacturing technology and machine tool technology, and a certificate in machinist general.

“In receiving this national recognition, the college and its faculty demonstrate their continued commitment to excellence in metalworking training within the state of Pennsylvania and for the greater good of the U.S. manufacturing industry,” said Catherine L. Ross, director of accreditation for NIMS.

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State Cabinet Officials Tour Campus on ‘Jobs’ Visit

With campus beauty all around, including the "Student Bodies" art installation spanning the campus mall, the group takes a shady stroll north from the ATHS.

Stopping by the dental hygiene lab

Penn College President Davie Jane Gilmour (left) walks with Secretary Manderino and others alongside the robotic welding stations.

Michael K. Patterson, a member of the college's welding faculty, scores a hit with his impressive work-in-progress: a larger-than-life baseball glove, complete with welded metal strands to simulate stitching.

Secretary Davin, at the podium

Two cabinet secretaries from Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration continued the “Jobs That Pay” tour in a Monday visit to Penn College, where they focused on workforce development and employer-training initiatives within the governor’s proposed 2015-16 budget for the commonwealth. Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis M. Davin and Department of Labor & Industry Secretary Kathy M. Manderino toured the college’s dental hygiene and welding labs, instructional areas that could benefit from a proposed increase in state appropriation. A press conference followed in the welding lab.

NYC Kids Get ‘Fresh’ Taste of Postsecondary Possibilities

In a lab full of priceless automobiles being restored by Penn College students, the visitors are allowed several supervised violations of the "look, but don't touch" rule. The youngsters take turns cranking a Ford Model T coil tester, generating enough voltage to illuminate a small light bulb.

A group of New York City youngsters, finishing a seven-day visit to Williamsport arranged through the Fresh Air Foundation, this week tasted the uniquely amazing opportunities of a Penn College degree. A rewarding experience for both the youngsters and their local host families, Fresh Air gives urban boys and girls a peek into life outside the city, and enticed Monday’s group with a higher-education option they might have thought was well beyond their reach. In an age-appropriate agenda fashioned by admissions representative Emily A. Weaver, the kids started their day with a brief video showcasing three Penn College students. “They were having fun while working toward their goals,” one boy noted, surprised that college isn’t all studious drudgery. A campus tour followed, then lunch in the Keystone Dining Room. The guests also visited the automotive restoration/collision repair and welding labs before burning off excess steam on the basketball court. The verdict? Unqualified success … and the wide-eyed promise by some to enroll as students within the decade.

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Plastics Workshop Proves Popular to Industry Professionals

At left, Christopher J. Gagliano, program manager for the Thermoforming Center of Excellence at Penn College, watches lab assistant Jacob W. Fry evaluate the wall thickness of a container produced in the thermoforming lab.

Summer is anything but vacation time for the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center at Pennsylvania College of Technology. The PIRC recently hosted 34 industry professionals from 10 states and Canada for its Sixth Annual National Hands-On Thin-Gauge/Roll-Fed Thermoforming Workshop.

The three-day course featured presentations from industry experts and hands-on sessions focusing on materials testing and operating and troubleshooting thermoforming equipment.

“It’s rewarding that this annual workshop attracts a variety of top experts and professionals from the plastics industry,” said Christopher J. Gagliano, PIRC program and technical service manager. “The interest in the workshop is a testament to our talented staff and the excellent facilities we enjoy at Penn College.”

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SMART Money’s on Problem-Solvers at Innovative Summer Camp

A participant checks progress on a 3-D printed elephant toy.

A member of the business Sirens of Sound explains to mentors a smartphone speaker developed by her company during the Wildcat Den Showcase.

Cell phone kickstands and charms were among team Copy, Paste, Print’s products.

A participant shows her team’s solution to a broken camera tripod.

A team shows off samples of 3-D printed toys, part of its week’s work.

Penn College’s annual SMART Girls summer camp attracted 34 high schoolers from across Pennsylvania, some with a strong interest in science, math, engineering or technology, and others just beginning to explore those options. During the four-day camp, the girls used additive manufacturing to solve problems – like creating replacement parts for broken consumer products and designing connectors to build structures out of plastic straws. They also used their newly honed computer-aided design and 3-D printing skills to develop a product line, supported by a business plan, resume and trade-show booth. All were used to pitch “investors,” the camp’s mentors, during the “Wildcat Den Showcase,” a SMART Girls take on television’s “Shark Tank.” SMART Girls – Science and Math Applications in Real-World Technologies for Girls – was implemented by Penn College to reverse the trend of girls to shy away from math and science courses and the rewarding, family-sustaining careers that use those skills. The camp, which also included career interest assessments and company tours, was facilitated by the college’s Outreach for K-12 Office. Mentors were Eric K. Albert, associate professor of machine tool technology/automated manufacturing at Penn College; Tom Gill, a science teacher at Central Columbia High School; Christina L. Herman, director of student services and career development for Loyalsock Township School District; and Alice S. Justice, school counselor at Central Columbia Middle School. Camp director was Tanya Berfield, project and data reporting technician in Outreach for K-12.

Penn College Students Earn Industry Certifications

Pennsylvania College of Technology students representing seven different majors recently proved their mastery of computer aided drafting and design software programs by passing certification exams.

Fifty-two students successfully completed the Certified SolidWorks Associate exam and one student earned Autodesk Inventor Professional certification. SolidWorks and Autodesk Inventor are industry-standard 3-D parametric software programs used primarily within the engineering drafting and design profession.

“Two years ago, we completely revised our curriculum to closely align with current industry standards and technology,” said J.D. Mather, assistant professor of engineering design technology. “Our enrollment in the engineering design program has substantially increased since these changes were made. This year, we more than doubled the number of students who successfully completed the exams. I am very pleased with the increase in certified users. The certification is an external validation that our curriculum is meeting industry standards.”

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Penn College Professors Present at National Conference

Faculty presenters

Two Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty members shared their expertise with an international audience by presenting at the recent COMMON Annual Meeting and Exposition in Anaheim, California.

Both Lisa R. Bock and Anita R. Wood, assistant professors of computer information technology, made two presentations during the four-day conference, which is COMMON’s premier educational event of the year. COMMON is the world’s largest professional association of IBM technology users and is dedicated to uniting the Power Systems community.

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Imagination, Real-World Possibilities Merge at Digital Future Camp

Matthew A. Bamonte (right) who graduated last month with a bachelor's degree in information technology sciences-gaming and simulation, assists a young camper with his question.

Young campers learn how to program simulation on a Lego robot.

Apps are where it's at! A group of campers learns how to develop mobile applications under the tutelage of Spyke M. Krepshaw, instructor of computer information technology.

A study in concentration

Campers and their mentors pause for a group shot in front of the ATHS after lunch on their final day.

Forty high school students from across Pennsylvania explored potential careers in Penn College’s fourth annual “Designing a Digital Future Camp” on Tuesday and Wednesday. The campers, entering 10th, 11th or 12th grade this fall, embraced the boundless employment possibilities of gaming, Web design, product design, mobile applications and graphic design during hands-on workshops in the Breuder Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center and the Bush Campus Center. The popular camp, one of a number offered on campus this summer, is a collaboration of the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies and the School of Sciences, Humanities & Visual Communications.

Benton Foundry Endows Scholarship at Penn College

From left, Elizabeth A. Biddle, director of corporate relations at Penn College, and members of the Hall family who have owned Benton Foundry for nearly 60 years: Kimberly Kindler, JoAnn Hall and Jeff Hall, company president.

A family-owned business spanning three generations is making a financial commitment to the next generation of Pennsylvania College of Technology students.

Benton Foundry Inc. recently endowed a scholarship, mainly for students in the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies.

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PPL Corp. Donates $3,000 to College’s Electrical Technology Program

Teri MacBride (left), PPL’s regional affairs director, presents a $3,000 check to Elizabeth A. Biddle, Penn College’s director of corporate relations.

A $3,000 donation from PPL Corp. will benefit students in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s various electrical majors.

Teri MacBride, PPL’s regional affairs director, recently presented the check to the college’s Institutional Advancement Office for use in the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies’ Electrical Technology Program.

“PPL has been a generous supporter of Penn College for years in a variety of ways, including annual cash gifts and in-kind donations,” said Elizabeth A. Biddle, the college’s director of corporate relations. “We appreciate the continued support for students and program with this donation.”

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