News about Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies

Campus Science Festival Entertains as It Inspires

Prospective members of Penn College's Class of 202? enjoy an educational day out of the classroom and onto an engaging campus.

More than 1,500 fifth-graders from nearly a dozen local and area school districts participated in Thursday’s sixth annual Science Festival at Penn College, gaining hands-on insight into a host of related careers. The youngsters were treated to a variety of captivating campus demonstrations during the day, and families were invited to a Field House full of attractions during the three-hour evening session.

Read more

Company Establishes Plastics Scholarship at Penn College

Penn College plastics students work in an extrusion lab under the direction of Gary E. McQuay, center, engineering manager for the Plastics Innovation Resource Center at the college. Sekisui SPI, part of Sekisui Chemical Co., is establishing a scholarship for first-year plastics students at Penn College.

A leading global thermoplastics company will reward students’ interest in plastics by establishing two $7,000 scholarships at Pennsylvania College of Technology for Fall 2017.

Preference for the Sekisui SPI Workforce Development Scholarship will be given to first-year students seeking a bachelor’s degree in plastics and polymer engineering technology, who reside in Pennsylvania or Michigan and rank in the top third of their high school graduating class.

Read more

National Publication Tours College’s Career-Making Labs

The visiting journalist observes manufacturing engineering technology majors - and SAE Baja teammates - Logan B. Goodhart (left), of Orangeville, and Jonathan R. Sutcliffe, of Chambersburg.

Students learn under the banner of Fronius USA, which has generously entrusted Penn College with equipment to benefit hundreds of welding majors this academic year.

Faculty member Roy H. Klinger gives Carlson a tour of the college's automotive restoration labs.

Elsewhere in College Avenue Labs, the guest gets faculty feedback from J.D. Mather, assistant professor of engineering design technology ...

... and Richard K. Hendricks Jr., instructor of automated manufacturing and machining.

Amanda Carlson, associate editor of Practical Welding Today magazine, visited campus on Wednesday for an upcoming story focusing on how colleges are preparing students for modern manufacturing careers. Carlson toured several college labs, including machining, advanced manufacturing, rapid prototyping and welding.  She also spent time talking with faculty and staff and members of the college’s SAE Baja team. It’s anticipated that Carlson’s story incorporating her Penn College experience will appear in the May/June issue of the publication.

Hands-On Experience Turns Chemistry Course Into Career Path

The Society of Plastics Engineers’ Eve Vitale shows an example of a thermoformed product.

Nicholas C. Moore, of Lock Haven, guides a group of students through the plastics and polymer technology department’s materials testing lab. Moore, who completed Penn College NOW courses in the Keystone Central School District, holds junior-level standing in his fourth semester in the plastics and polymer engineering technology major.

Students measure borax and a polymer used in white glue to form a thermoset compound.

Stirring a concoction, students observe an endothermic reaction as new chemical bonds form.

The result is a “slime” that, Vitale tells the students, was used in the filming of “Ghostbusters.”

Seventy Keystone Central School District chemistry students converged on Penn College on Tuesday to learn how their chemistry lessons apply to the field of plastics. During a four-hour stay on campus, they took part in a variety of plastics experiments courtesy of the Society of Plastics Engineers’ PlastiVan program. Under the instruction of SPE Foundation Director Eve Vitale, the students learned about the chemistry of plastics and future career options while they made several polymers of their own. The PlastiVan’s visit was sponsored by Sekisui SPI, of Bloomsburg. The program travels to schools and companies throughout North America, educating people of all ages about the chemistry, history, processing, manufacturing, sustainability and application of plastics, all through hands-on experiences that spark scientific curiosity. In addition, the Keystone Central students took student-led tours of the college’s plastics and polymer laboratories and of the campus. More than half of the students in attendance are enrolled in Penn College’s Fundamentals of Chemistry course, taught during the school day by Keystone Central instructors through the Penn College NOW dual-enrollment program.

Gaming Student Mentors Teen in Potentially Life-Changing Encounter

The lesson is a success!

Pennsylvania College of Technology facilitated “A Little Love” this month for a young technology fan available for adoption. The college’s gaming and simulation lab in the Breuder Advanced Technology and Health Sciences Center hosted WBRE-TV’s monthly segment that showcases children seeking a permanent family. Chris Langlois, WBRE’s morning co-anchor, watched Penn College information technology sciences-gaming and simulation student James C. Temoshenko, of Kane, share his expertise with 13-year-old Mitchell. The Feb. 5 experience served as a confidence booster and career-exploration activity for the teenager, who proved to be a quick study in developing a computer game. (He even created a personalized second level to the game during the 60-minute lesson!) The segment is scheduled to air throughout the day on Wednesday –  at 4:20, 5:20 and 6:20 a.m. on WBRE/WYOU; at 11:20 a.m. (WBRE); at 12:15 p.m. (WYOU) and during the 5 p.m. newscast on WBRE – and is available online.

Read more

Last updated February 14, 2017 | Posted in Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies, Information Technology, Students | This gallery contains 8 photos. | Tagged as | 2 Comments

Families Invited for Night of Hands-On Science

Pennsylvania College of Technology physics professor David S. Richards uses visual aids to talk about past U.S. space missions during a previous Science Festival at the college.

Hands-on science fun is the focus of an evening designed for local families on Thursday, Feb. 16, in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s Field House.

The college will team up with Lycoming College and the Williamsport/Lycoming Chamber of Commerce to offer the city’s sixth annual Science Festival from 5 to 8 p.m.

The event features hands-on activities geared toward elementary and middle school students and their families, presented by local businesses and organizations, including school and college-affiliated groups. The event is intended to make learning fun and to stimulate children’s interest in math, science and exciting careers in related fields.

Read more

Students Perform Well in Prestigious Builders’ Competition

Members of the two- and four-year Penn College teams gather outside the International Builders’ Show in Orlando. From left are Carlos Rojas, Williamsport; Nicholas D. Gieger, Dingmans Ferry; Chad W. Hawkins, Williamsport; Robert G. Jackson III, Butler; Casey L. Grim, Red Lion; Hanna J. Williams, Marion, N.Y.; Everett B. Appleby, Wilkes-Barre; Jordan M. Scott, Cogan Station; Lindsay A. Lane, McKean; Ryan Z. Zwickle, Slatington; and Liam R. McGarvey, Cogan Station.

A pair of teams comprising students from construction-related programs at Pennsylvania College of Technology admirably met the challenge of competition at the recent National Association of Home Builders International Builders’ Show in Orlando, Florida.

A team representing associate-degree majors placed fifth in a field of 15 entrants from across the country in the Residential Construction Management Competition, and their colleagues from bachelor-degree majors finished 16th out of 35 institutions.

“The teams worked all of the fall semester on the problems given to them,” said Levon A. Whitmyer, instructor of building construction technology, noting that competition preparation is undertaken 100-percent outside of students’ class time. “The problems typically are future, real-world projects within the construction industry.”

Read more

WVIA to Rebroadcast Series Episode on ‘Green’ Careers

"Working Class"

Working Class: Build and Grow Green,” the second episode of a Telly Award-winning series co-produced by Penn College, will be rebroadcast at 7 p.m. Thursday on WVIA. The hourlong documentary invites consideration of a range of options by those looking into “green” careers, exploring opportunities such as architecture and sustainable design; building construction and construction management; building automation; electrical technology and power generation; heating, ventilation and air conditioning; forestry; and horticulture. The episode can also be viewed on the series’ comprehensive website, which additionally features a producer’s blog, video segments, K-12 educational resources and an art challenge.

Longtime Industry Partner Entrusts Welding Equipment to College

Representatives from Penn College’s welding department and Miller Electric Manufacturing Co. mark the company’s equipment loan to the program. From left are Matt W. Nolan, welding instructor; Michael C. Schelb, welding lecturer; Rick Conrad, field application engineer at Miller; Rick Scharenbroch, industrial district manager at Miller; and Timothy S. Turnbach, welding instructor.

A leading welding company is augmenting its strong relationship with Pennsylvania College of Technology by entrusting nearly $250,000 worth of equipment to the school.

Miller Electric Manufacturing Co. made the two-year equipment loan to benefit approximately 350 welding students at the college. Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in welding and fabrication engineering technology, an associate degree in welding technology, or a certificate in welding will use the entrusted arc welding equipment.

“We greatly appreciate Miller Electric’s generosity and commitment to welding’s future,” said David R. Cotner, dean of industrial, computing and engineering technologies. “Their continued support of our current students, not to mention many of our graduates, is a testament to the quality of our welding department at Penn College.”

Read more

Penn College Plastics Student Awarded Scholarship

Logan A. Tate

A Pennsylvania College of Technology student is one of seven nationwide recipients of a scholarship from the Plastics Pioneers Association.

The nonprofit, membership organization awarded a $3,000 scholarship to Logan A. Tate, of Williamsport, for his commitment to becoming a hands-on professional in the plastics industry as a technician or engineer.

Read more

Foundation’s Generosity Endows Scholarship, Creates Opportunity

A significant grant from the Tamaqua-based John E. Morgan Foundation will allow students from that area to enroll in Pennsylvania College of Technology’s distinctive “degrees that work.”

The nonprofit foundation’s $500,000 contribution establishes the John E. Morgan Scholarship, which will give first preference to graduates of Tamaqua Area High School who are pursuing “a degree that is not readily available from other institutions, at a comparable price, within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.”

Read more

Penn College Contingent Participates in Conferences

J.D. Mather, assistant professor of engineering design technology at Penn College, holds his Autodesk Expert Elite Award, which was presented to him for his outstanding contribution to Autodesk community forums.

Pennsylvania College of Technology students and faculty were big winners recently in Las Vegas. The contingent attended two major industry conferences during the same week.

Representatives from the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies participated in FABTECH 2016 and the Autodesk University conference. FABTECH is the largest metal forming, fabricating, welding and finishing event in North America; the Autodesk event is geared to those who utilize the company’s computer-aided design software.

J.D. Mather, assistant professor of engineering design technology, received special recognition at the Autodesk conference. He completed the Inventor 2017 certified professional exam and was presented with the Autodesk Expert Elite Award for his outstanding contribution to Autodesk community forums.

Read more

Penn College to Showcase ‘degrees that work’ at State Farm Show

Student Kassandra Sellinger, a culinary arts and systems student from Linden, and Chef Mike Ditchfield perform a cooking demonstration on the Culinary Connection stage at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in January 2016.

Nearly 6,000 animals, 10,000 competitive entries and 300 commercial exhibits – and more than 100 rewarding career pathways uniquely represented by Pennsylvania College of Technology – will be on display as America’s largest indoor agricultural exposition celebrates its 101st anniversary next month.

In what has become a New Year’s custom, the college will show off its prestigious “degrees that work” from Jan. 7-14 at the Pennsylvania Farm Show in Harrisburg, where visitors can get a participatory glimpse at a rewarding future.

“Attending the PA Farm Show is a beloved tradition for Penn College. During the weeklong event, Admissions, Alumni Relations and Academic Affairs will showcase all of the amazing opportunities that await students on our campuses,” said Claire Z. Biggs, coordinator of admissions events and services. “We hope that, through our hands-on activities, students, alumni and families will learn why we have so much Penn College Pride! We can’t wait to meet all of the Farm Show guests this year and share what makes applied technology education so special.”

Read more

Student Manufactures Emblems for River Walk Initiative

Joel Bergerstock caption: Penn College manufacturing engineering technology student Joel E. Bergerstock, of Liverpool, proudly displays one of three emblems he recently made for The Bicycle Center’s Susquehanna River Walk initiative. Bergerstock is standing in front of the electrical discharge machine he used to cut aluminum to form the emblems.

The manufacturing skills of a Pennsylvania College of Technology student are helping a local business highlight its commitment to the community.

Joel E. Bergerstock, of Liverpool, produced aluminum emblems depicting the logo of The Bicycle Center for the South Williamsport business’ Susquehanna River Walk initiative. The emblems will be placed on each of the three repair stations that The Bicycle Center intends to install on the paved walkway and bike trail, which loops atop the levee system in Williamsport, South Williamsport and Loyalsock Township.

Read more

College Faculty Help High-Schoolers Crack ‘Code’

In a “Coding Unplugged” session, a student solves a problem by moving disks from one spot to another. Students learned that repeating and combining the movements that solve a simple problem can solve more complex problems.

High school students from as far as Warren County in northwestern Pennsylvania and Chester County in the state’s southeastern corner were among those participating in an “Hour of Code” event at Penn College on Thursday. The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in more than 180 countries. At Penn College, the students gathered for a “Coding Unplugged” activity with Anita R. Wood, associate professor of computer information technology. Later, they toured campus and practiced coding Ozobots with Spyke M. Krepshaw, instructor of web and interactive media, and Alicia McNett, instructor of computer information technology. A project of the nonprofit Code.org, the Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code,” to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with one-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts. Most Hour of Code events are scheduled during Computer Science Education Week. The week coincides with the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, who was born Dec. 9, 1906.