News about Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies

College Faculty Help High-Schoolers Crack ‘Code’

In a “Coding Unplugged” session, a student solves a problem by moving disks from one spot to another. Students learned that repeating and combining the movements that solve a simple problem can solve more complex problems.

High school students from as far as Warren County in northwestern Pennsylvania and Chester County in the state’s southeastern corner were among those participating in an “Hour of Code” event at Penn College on Thursday. The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in more than 180 countries. At Penn College, the students gathered for a “Coding Unplugged” activity with Anita R. Wood, associate professor of computer information technology. Later, they toured campus and practiced coding Ozobots with Spyke M. Krepshaw, instructor of web and interactive media, and Alicia McNett, instructor of computer information technology. A project of the nonprofit Code.org, the Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify “code,” to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with one-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts. Most Hour of Code events are scheduled during Computer Science Education Week. The week coincides with the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, who was born Dec. 9, 1906.

Turning Castoffs Into Couture

Mahaffey (left) joins her runway entourage: Samantha M. Via, Jasmin Vega, Meghan J. Herman and Alexandra Pyda. Pyda is a nursing major; the others are enrolled in industrial design.

Thomas E. Ask, industrial design professor, and Via's mother, Rona, check out the "trashion" accessories.

A voguish Vega strikes a pose ...

... and designer and model have fun with fashion.

The “Trashion Fashion Show,” industrial design student Ashley E. Mahaffey’s senior project with a (re)purpose, was a clear crowd-pleaser in Penn College’s Thompson Professional Development Center. The Hughesville resident crafted clothing and accessories from discarded newspapers, magazines and the like, enlisting four friends to model them and eliciting considerable applause as each was unveiled. “Ashley was very happy with the results and very brave in embarking on a project like this,” said Thomas E. Ask, professor of industrial design and Mahaffey’s capstone adviser. “She had great assistance by an industry expert, Valerie Beggs, and put tons of energy, enthusiasm and intellect into the project.”
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer

 

Penn College Industrial Design Student Excels in Industry Setting

Jasmin Vega

The inquisitive, hard-working student faced a dilemma when pondering college. She possessed considerable artistic talent, yet loved to study people and the reasons behind their actions. Confronted with the career-path choice, she picked psychology over art and enrolled at a community college.

A year later, the student decided to scrap her psychology track and bridge her disparate interests by transferring to Pennsylvania College of Technology as an industrial design major.

If her performance at a recent internship is an accurate gauge, Jasmin Vega made the right decision.

Vega – a Clifton, New Jersey, native, who resides in nearby Woodland Park – excelled interning for IBC Shell Packaging in Lake Success, New York. The company designs, engineers and manufactures packaging, displays and giftware for global brands, including many in the luxury, spirits and beauty sectors.

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Gaming Students Present Final Projects to CC Audience

Timothy E. Duclos, of State College impresses the Bush Campus Center crowd.

Classmates and others listen intently to student presentations.

Josephina L. Bair, of Mill Hall, details her work with Dress Maker 2016.

Penn's Inn offers intimate space, appropriately enhanced by technology.

Students from the information technology sciences-gaming and simulation major who are completing the capstone course presented their senior projects to fellow students, faculty and the community over multiple days in Penn’s Inn. “The presentations provide students with the opportunity to showcase their work, as well as describe their learning from both designing and implementing the project,” explained Anita R. Wood, associate professor of computer information technology.
Photos by Tia G. La, student photographer

Successful Alumna Shares Vision, Visibility With Club Members

The 2013 alum interacts with IT majors on return to campus.

Visiting grad gets a big-screen welcome.

Penn College’s newly formed Game Development Club recently hosted a visit by Anna Maree Manciet, of Alienware Live, whose Penn College degrees include a 2013 bachelor’s in web design and multimedia. She shared interesting stories and knowledge of the responsibilities and technical aspects of being a producer and on-air personality of a popular Twitch.tv live-stream channel. Among the topics covered were the technical configuration of hardware and software for a live stream, tips and advice on building and managing an audience, and various methods of charity work that she has had the opportunity to do throughout her career. “We were very excited to have her visit. Many of our guests took a lot of interesting information away from the event,” said organization President James C. Temoshenko, of Kane, an information technology sciences-gaming and simulation major. “The club is taking inspiration by planning some live-streaming events of our own in the near future.”
Photos provided

Chevron Continues Support for Penn College Education, Training

Chevron continues investment

Through its Workforce Development & Continuing Education office, Pennsylvania College of Technology has received $416,685 from Chevron U.S.A. to support scholarships, curriculum development and ongoing outreach in energy and manufacturing.

Penn College will continue the promising practices first started through ShaleNET, a U.S. Department of Labor grant aimed at providing training and education in these important industry sectors.

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Penn College Student Transforms Trash to Fashion for Show

Penn College of industrial design major Ashley E. Mahaffey, of Hughesville, works on transforming trash into fashion as part of her senior capstone project. Her efforts will culminate in a free, public showcase, “Trashion Fashion Show,” on Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. in the college’s Thompson Professional Development Center.

A Pennsylvania College of Technology student’s ability to transform trash to fashion will be showcased for the public on Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. in the college’s Thompson Professional Development Center.

The “Trashion Fashion Show” is a free event devised by industrial design student Ashley E. Mahaffey, of Hughesville, as part of her senior capstone project.

“This show is intended to be evocative, to promote the upcycling lifestyle, which repurposes materials that no longer have use,” said Thomas E. Ask, professor of industrial design and Mahaffey’s capstone adviser. “Ashley is expressing design of three-dimensional forms as fashion. She has a longtime interest in fashion.”

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Penn College Students, Faculty Attend ‘Women in Technology’ Event

Female students and faculty from Penn College demonstrated their commitment to technology at the recent College to Careers: Women in Technology Conference in Harrisburg.

More than 25 female students and faculty from Pennsylvania College of Technology demonstrated their commitment to technology by attending a recent statewide event in Harrisburg.

During the College to Careers: Women in Technology Conference, the Penn College contingent experienced a panel discussion with eight women technology leaders and enjoyed networking opportunities.

“It was a very valuable experience for our students,” said Bradley M. Webb, assistant dean of the School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies, who helped organize Penn College’s participation. “The students were able to not only listen to, but also interact with many impressive women in technology. The conference reinforced that gender should never be a barrier to success in technology-focused careers.”

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‘bots Do Battle in ‘Fall Brawl’

There's a lot of serious work before the fun begins!

Nearly 30 battle-ready robots – painstakingly designed, fabricated and tested by Pennsylvania College of Technology students – squared off in the recent “Fall Brawl 2016” robotic design competition in the college’s Field House. Sponsored by the Student Wildcats of Robotic Design, the knockout tournament pitted “beetleweight” robots (weighing 1 to 3 pounds) against one another before a campus and community audience. “The event was a resounding success, with enough robots to keep the action going for the whole day,” said S.W.O.R.D.’s Timothy R. Thompson, an electronics and computer engineering technology major from Stephens City, Virginia. “The students are currently improving their robots, and the next event will be even more ‘destructive.’ As the event gains recognition, more and more outside people will be in attendance to test our members’ designs.” Winners in the 3-pound category were Don Doerfler, “Circuit Breaker,” first; Nate Franklin, “Thunder Child,” second; and William Hayden, “Wildcat1,” third. Placing in the 1-pound category were Franklin, “Slim Pickens,” first; Stanley Bohenek, “Discharge,” second; and David Probst, “Ready or Not,” third. Organizers said the event will definitely become an annual one, with another open competition to be scheduled in the spring.

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High School Students Celebrate STEM Day at Penn College

Penn College student Shawn L. Sheeley Jr., of Kersey, shows a high school student how to use surveying equipment. The hands-on workshop was part of a National STEM Day celebration at the college that brought homeschoolers and students from four area high schools to campus.

A group of 90 high-schoolers spent Nov. 8 at Pennsylvania College of Technology, where they explored a variety of careers as part of National STEM Day.

“STEM” is short for science, technology, engineering and math. According to the Population Reference Bureau, U.S. policymakers watch trends in the science and engineering labor force because high-tech workers increase our capacity for innovation and ability to compete in the global economy.

Penn College’s STEM Day activities were designed to give high school students a hands-on glimpse of some in-demand STEM-related careers.

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Students’ 3-D Designs are 2-Delightful for Words

A most menacing visage, courtesy of David S. Carlson

Brendan S. Beppel, with his Sleepy Hollow-inspired creation

Leander M. Shaffer turned his pumpkin into a first-place vehicle for artistic expression.

About 40 students in Penn College’s School of Industrial, Computing & Engineering Technologies recently plied their considerable 3-D computer skills in a traditional activity that combines hands-on proficiency with Halloween playfulness. Students across three sections of Technical Drawing I and Detailing I – taught by Katherine A. Walker, assistant professor of engineering design technology; J.D. Mather, assistant professor of engineering design technology; and Craig A. Miller, instructor of engineering design technology – participated in the third annual virtual pumpkin-carving event. First-place winners, as chosen by faculty, were engineering design technology majors Brendan S. Beppel, of Royersford, and Leander M. Shaffer, of Lewisburg; and David S. Carlson, an engineering CAD technology student from Elizabethtown.
Photos provided

Penn College IT Faculty Member Featured in Publication

Lisa Bock

A major information technology publication is highlighting the expertise and accomplishments of a Pennsylvania College of Technology faculty member.

The November/December issue of IBM Systems Magazine–Mainframe edition showcases Lisa Bock, assistant professor of computer information technology, as one of a dozen women role models in the IT field.

Bock is described in the story, written by Shirley S. Savage, as a “security ambassador, who has spent 20 demanding years in IT.”

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College Receives Grant to Boost Cyber Security Workforce

The National Science Foundation has recognized Pennsylvania College of Technology’s commitment to tomorrow’s workforce by awarding the institution a grant intended to bolster the pipeline of information assurance/cyber defense professionals.

The $438,391 CyberCorps grant will facilitate the college’s efforts to excite high school students about rewarding careers in cyber security. The college is developing an after-school program for high schoolers, who will earn college credit for free while being introduced to the academic and professional aspects of the information security field.

“There is a tremendous demand for qualified professionals in the information assurance/cyber defense sector,” said Sandra Gorka, associate professor of computer science and the college’s principal investigator for the grant. “The opportunities are varied, and salaries in the field are well above the national average. This program can be a valuable introduction and steppingstone to fulfilling careers.”

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Saudi Students Hold Informative Expo for Campus Community

Omar A. Aljallal, a plastics and polymer engineering technology major, takes visitors on a journey to the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina.

Saudi Arabian students at Pennsylvania College of Technology recently organized a crosscultural presentation to familiarize the campus community with their homeland.

One year after their initial program – which won two honors at the 2015 Student Activities Awards banquet – the Saudi Student Organization returned to the college’s Thompson Professional Development Center for a follow-up event.

“Being at Penn College, where students get the most support, gave us a chance to share and discuss our pride freely,” said Abdulaziz S. Alomani, a plastics and polymer engineering technology major, who was among those involved in planning the Oct. 24 Saudi Expo. “The event came about to serve as a cultural bridge between the United States and Saudi Arabia and to allow us to share with our American friends what the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is all about.”

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Penn College Students Participate in Major Plastics Conference

Plastics and polymer engineering technology students at Penn College participated in the Society of Plastics Engineers 32nd Annual Blow Molding Conference. From left are: Seth E. Cook, Mountville; Hannah G. Maize, Riverside; Logan A. Tate, Williamsport; Sapphire E. Naugle, Jersey Shore; Anthony P. Wagner, Lock Haven; and Tom J. Van Pernis, instructor of plastics and polymer technology.

Six Pennsylvania College of Technology plastics students enriched their education by attending the Society of Plastics Engineers 32nd Annual Blow Molding Conference in Atlanta earlier this month.

The plastics and polymer engineering technology majors participated in several technical presentations related to blow molding and networked with potential employers throughout the three-day event.

“Our students were able to take a closer look into the blow molding industry and learn about new and emerging technologies,” said Tom J. Van Pernis, instructor of plastics and polymer technology, who accompanied the Penn College contingent. “They distributed resumes and business cards throughout the event. Companies are extremely interested in plastics students who graduate from Penn College.”

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